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Course Catalog

List of Courses

ACCT 201

Principles of Accounting I

3 cr

This course introduces students to basic financial accounting theory and practice. Areas covered include: the accounting cycle, measuring business income, cash, receivables, inventory, investments, long-term assets, liabilities, and stockholders' equity.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ACCT 202

Principles of Accounting II

3 cr

This course introduces students to management accounting concepts for decision making. The course is concerned with examining and applying methods for analyzing and accumulating data to provide information to managers. The emphasis is on identifying what information is needed, designing systems to get the required information, and using the information to make decisions.

Prerequisite: ACCT 201     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ACCT 311

Intermediate Accounting I

3 cr

This is the foundational course for financial accounting and reporting. It is the first of two intermediate accounting courses that covers accounting theory and principles for defining, measuring, and reporting financial information. This course emphasizes assets. It includes discussions of the conceptual framework, regulatory environment, and ethical issues. Provides an opportunity to understand the challenges and limitations of generally accepted accounting standards Considers alternative practices often suggested for use but not generally accepted.

Co-requisite: ACCT 202       Course Offered: Every Fall

ACCT 313

Intermediate Accounting II

3 cr

This is the second of two intermediate accounting courses. It continues the coverage of of the content and presentation of corporate financial statements. Emphasis in this course is on liabilities and equity. It also covers earnings per share. Topics covered are relatively more complex and more detailed.

Prerequisite: ACC 311       Course Offered: Every Spring

ACCT 321

Accounting Information Systems

3 cr

This course is a practicum in commercial accounting systems. Students will perform general ledger, accounts payable, accounts receivable, billing, purchase order, inventory, payroll and job costing functions using a commercial software package. The software will be used to design specialized reports for budgeting, financial analysis, product costing and for analyzing cost management techniques. Another package designed specifically for activity-based costing will be used to learn how this method of managing overhead can enhance a business’s performance. Student learning will be developed and measured through computer intense projects, class discussion, library and field research. Systems theory and information technology topics are also discussed.

Prerequisite: ACCT 202        Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

ACCT 331

Individual Tax Accounting

3 cr

This course addresses taxation of individual income. Basic tax concepts are examined along with tax rules and regulations. Tax preparation and tax research software are used extensively.

Prerequisite: ACCT 311          Course Offered: Fall of every even year

ACCT 332

Corporate Tax Accounting

3 cr

This course is designed to teach students to recognize major tax issues inherent in business and financial transactions. Federal taxation acquaints the student with the social and economic policy implications of the Tax Code. The course focuses on fundamental tax concepts, the mastery of which will enable students to incorporate tax factors into business and investment decisions.

Prerequisite: ACCT 311      Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

ACCT 341

Managerial Cost Accounting

3 cr

A critical analysis of cost concepts as they relate to the administrative process. Includes the presentation of case studies and the use of electronic spreadsheets.

Prerequisite: ACCT 311     Course Offered: Fall of every even year

ACCT 401

Advanced Accounting Practice

3 cr

An advanced study in the theory and related problems applicable to specialized topics in advanced financial accounting. Topics include: partnerships, business combinations, installment sales, consignments, foreign operations and estates and trusts.

Prerequisite: ACCT 311     Course Offered: Spring of every even year

ACCT 403

Accounting for Government and Not-for-Profit Organizations

3 cr

Deals with financial accounting and reporting for federal, state and local governments and for medical, educational, religious, human services, charitable and other non-business organizations. Topics include: fund accounting; financial reporting and budgetary control for not-for-profit organizations; program-planning-budgeting systems; and governmental and institutional auditing.

Prerequisite: ACCT 311       Course Offered: Spring of every even year

ACCT 406

Auditing Theory and Practice

3 cr

Examination of the philosophy, concepts and techniques pertaining to the auditing process.

Prerequisite: ACCT 311      Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

ACCT 473

Internship in Accounting

1, 2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

Crosslisted: BUSN 471      *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement

ACCT 474

Internship in Accounting

1, 2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

Crosslisted: BUSN 471     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement

BIOL 115

The Process of Biology

3 cr

(Meets the first core science requirement). An introduction to biology as a way of knowing and communicating about living systems. The themes are how living systems process energy and information, ecologically relate to their environments and evolve over time. The goal of this course is for the student to gain an increased level of proficiency in scientific literacy; including theory application, evaluating evidence and manipulating concepts.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BIOL 120

Evolutionary and Ecological Biology: The Dynamic Environment

3 cr

An exploration of how living things relate to each other in both space (ecology) and time (evolution). Included is an overview of the history and diversity of life on earth, an examination of representatives of various taxonomic groups as well as a study of taxonomy itself. BIOL 120, 108 and 109 are required for Biology majors, and may be completed in any order.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BIOL 125

The Form & Function of Biological Organisms

3 cr

An overview of the anatomy and physiology of plants and animals, with an emphasis on human structures. The interrelationships of the hierarchical levels of biological organization will be discussed. BIOL 120, 108 and 109 are required for Biology majors, and may be completed in any order.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BIOL 130

Cells and Chromosomes

3 cr

An exploration of variations on the themes of biology at the cellular level, including subcellular architecture and ultrastructure; metabolism; molecular biology; cell signaling; cellular reproduction; and an introduction into the concepts of genetics and development. Since this course will involve the examination of living systems at the molecular level, this course should only be taken after students have had at least one semester of college-level chemistry. Students should have had a successful experience in chemistry at the college level prior to taking BIOL 130.

Prerequisite: CHEM 142.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BIOL 135

General Biology II Laboratory

1 cr

(Is required of all biology majors in conjunction with BIOL 120, 125 or 130) This is the spring semester lab that is meant to accompany biology lectures. Topics include numerous dissections, taxonomic identifications, a systematic survey of the five kingdoms and ecological studies.

Course Offered: Every Spring

BIOL 140

The Methods of Biology Lab

1 cr

(Is required of all biology majors in conjunction with BIOL 120, 125 or 130) This fall semester lab is meant to accompany the general biology lectures. The lab is designed to provide intensive training in laboratory techniques that are involved in cell biology. Laboratory exercises include microscopy, genetics, enzymology, biological chemistry and animal behavior. Students will also gain experience in developing critical thinking skills, scientific writing, computer applications and statistical analysis of data.

Course Offered: Every Fall

BIOL 150

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

3 cr

The first course in a two course sequence that examines the anatomy and physiology of the human body. This course begins with the study of the levels of structural organization and proceeds with an in-depth study of the integumentary, musculoskeletal, nervous and endocrine systems.

Course Offered: Every Fall

BIOL 151

Anatomy Lab

1 cr

This lab features dissection of the organ systems of the cat, with supporting dissections of some other animal organs, including the heart, brain and kidney. Structures of the organs and systems will be correlated with human structures.

Corequisite: BIOL 150 or 152.     Course Offered: Every Fall

BIOL 152

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

3 cr

This is the second course in a two-course sequence that examines the anatomy and physiology of the human body. This course provides an in-depth study of the cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, immune, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems.

Prerequisite: BIOL 150     Course Offered: Every Spring

BIOL 210

Genetics

3 cr

A thorough familiarization with the principles of classical genetics of representative organisms in all kingdoms, with special emphasis on humans. The function of genes in developmental systems is emphasized. Special topics include consideration of ethical issues.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of a core course in mathematics and BIOL 130     Course Offered: Every Spring

BIOL 211

Genetics Laboratory

1 cr

A hands-on, practical series of experiments and computer simulations in the analysis of heredity.

Corequisite: BIOL 310     Prerequisite: BIOL 130     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

BIOL 215

Ecology

3 cr

Ecology is an introduction to biological organization at the population, community, and ecosystem level. This course explores the interrelatedness of the biological, chemical, and physical world. Topics include experimental design, mathematical modeling, climate, water balance, energy flow, nutrient cycling, adaptation, community succession, and symbiosis.

Prerequisite: BIOL 120, 125, 130     Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

BIOL 216

Ecology Laboratory

1 cr

Ecology Laboratory involves the practice of designing field experiments for measuring plant and animal communities. In this course students will compile databases, conduct statistical analyses, and present the results of field experiments in both written and oral formats. Field trips and field work are required.

Corequisite: BIOL 315     Prerequisite: BIOL 120     Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

BIOL 320

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

3 cr

An in-depth study of the comparative anatomy and systematic physiology of the vertebrate organisms, with emphasis on evolutionary relatedness.

Corequisite: BIOL 321     Prerequisite: BIOL 120, 125, 130    Course Offered: Spring of every even year

BIOL 321

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory

1 cr

Experimental, observational and comparative studies of the structure and function of organ systems in vertebrates.

Corequisite: BIOL 320     Course Offered: Spring of every even year

BIOL 330

Developmental Biology

3 cr

A detailed study of the mechanisms of development, from gametogenesis through organogenesis, with particular emphasis on gene action, induction, cell movements, adhesion and pattern development. Special topics include regeneration and cancer.

Prerequisite: Any 300-level biology course     Corequisite: BIOL 331     Course Offered: Fall of every even year

BIOL 331

Developmental Biology Laboratory

1 cr

Experimental study and embryology of the principles of development in selected invertebrates, amphibians, avians and mammals.

Corequisite: BIOL 330     Course Offered: Fall of every even year

BIOL 340

Cellular and Molecular Biology

3 cr

A detailed exploration of the physical and chemical processes and the ultrastructure underlying the functional activities of cells; aspects of molecular biology, immunology, programmed cell death, signaling systems and gene regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

Prerequisite: BIOL 120, BIOL 125, BIOL 130, and CHEM 231     Corequisite: BIOL 341     Course Offered: Every Spring

BIOL 341

Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory

1 cr

Extensive use of basic and advanced instrumentation and the development of laboratory skills in the physiological and biochemical study of the activities of cells and organelles. Topics include subcellular fractionation, techniques used in cell and tissue culture research, and the isolation, purification and characterization of biological macromolecules. Special emphasis is placed on the evaluation and interpretation of lab data, correlation with library research and presentation of data in a scientific report format.

Corequisite: BIOL 340     Course Offered: Every Spring

BIOL 375

Student Research

1 cr

Independent student research. Students will design and perform a research project with the consent and guidance of a faculty mentor. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Note: A research project manual describing the requirements for this project series will be distributed. The student will be expected to acknowledge and agree to the guidelines as delineated.

Course Offered: Every Fall

BIOL 376

Student Research

1 cr

Independent student research. Students will design and perform a research project with the consent and guidance of a faculty mentor. This course may be taken as a continuation from the previous semester, or may be limited to only the Spring semester. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Note: A research project manual describing the requirements for this project series will be distributed. The student will be expected to acknowledge and agree to the guidelines as delineated.

Course Offered: Every Spring

BIOL 401

Animal Behavior

3 cr

An evolutionary approach to the study of animal behavior. The course will address the adaptive significance of animal behavior focusing on how and why various behaviors have developed.

Course Offered: On Demand

BIOL 402

Animal Behavior Laboratory

1 cr

A study of animal behavior in the laboratory and field. This course, designed to accompany BIOL 401 Animal Behavior, will provide students with hands-on experience in studying animal behavior from a nonanthropomorphic point of view. The course will include field trips, laboratory studies, and a personal research project. Regular laboratory reports will be required.

Course Offered: On Demand

BIOL 414

Biochemistry

3 cr

An intermediate-level course in the description of macromolecular structure and function. Topics include an indepth study of the four classes of Biological macromolecules, enzyme kinetics and metabolic pathways. Emphasis is placed on metabolic processes, their regulation and integration in living systems.

Prerequisite: BIOL 120, 125, 130, and CHEM 231     Course Offered: Every Fall

BIOL 420

Toxicology

3 cr

General principles of toxicology, including dose-response mechanisms, metabolism, distribution and the elimination of toxicants. Emphasis is placed upon various mechanisms of toxicity in a diverse representation of chemical substances, carcinogens, mutagens and teratogens.

Prerequisite: BIOL 340     Course Offered: On Demand

BIOL 434

Invertebrate Zoology

3 cr

Invertebrates compose the vast majority of the animal kingdom. Students will acquire a fluency in speech and writing for the major facts and concepts of the science of invertebrate zoology and will appreciate the diversity of animal life, its underlying unity, and the difficulty of discerning the evolutionary history and phylogenetic relationships of the animal kingdom.

Course Offered: On Demand

BIOL 436

Physiological Ecology

3 cr

The application of ecological principles to problem solving at the organismal, population and ecosystem levels. Emphasis is placed on human interactions. Topics include organismal responses to stressors, human population dynamics, ecosystem responses to disturbances and global environmental change.

Prerequisites: BIOL 315 and BIOL 221     Co-requisite: BIOL 437     Course Offered: On Demand

BIOL 437

Physiological Ecology Laboratory

1 cr

Field and laboratory training in the measurements of the chemical, physical and biological attributes of ecosystems. The ecosystems studied include forests, streams, lakes, wetlands and mesocosm ecosystems. One weekend field trip is required in addition to regularly scheduled outings. Students are also required to design and conduct an individual research project.

Prerequisite: BIOL 316     Corequisite: BIOL 436     Course Offered: On Demand

BIOL 440

Microbiology

3 cr

The focus of this course in the classification and major characteristics of bacteria, viruses and microscopic eukaryotes. Emphasis will be placed upon microbes that are responsible for infectious diseases in humans. Topics include microbial metabolism and genetics, basic concepts of epidemiology and immunology.

Corequisite: BIOL 441     Prerequisite: Any 300-level BIOL course     Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

BIOL 441

Microbiology Laboratory

1 cr

A practical, hands-on course that provides training in commonly used techniques of microbe identification and microbiology research. Laboratory sessions include training in preparing sterile media, aseptic technique in the culturing of microbial cultures, the use of biochemical techniques to identify bacteria, microscopy and staining techniques, and fermentation in food and beverages.

Corequisite: BIOL 440     Prerequisite: Any 300 level BIOL course     Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

BIOL 462

Cancer Biology

3 cr

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the underlying principles, concepts and molecular mechanisms of cancer. The theme of cancer as a genetic disease will be studied in detail. Emphasis will be placed upon an understanding of signaling mechanisms, and how aberrant signal transduction pathways affect cell architecture and function. Students are required to register as student members to the American Association of Cancer Research (student membership is free). Students must also keep a journal on a specific type of cancer of their choice.

Prerequisities: BIOL 120; BIOL 125; BIOL 130; BIOL 310     Course Offered: On Demand

BIOL 473

Internship in Biology

1,2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement

BIOL 474

Internship in Biology

1,2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement

BIOL 475

Student Research

1 cr

Independent student research. Students will design and perform a research project with the consent and guidance of a faculty mentor. This course may be taken as a continuation from the junior year, or may be limited to only a single semester or the senior year. Note: A research project manual describing the requirements for this project series will be distributed. The student will be expected to acknowledge and agree to the guidelines as delineated.

Prerequisite: Senior standing.     Course Offered: Every Fall

BIOL 476

Student Research

1 cr

Independent student research. Students will design and perform a research project with the consent and guidance of a faculty mentor. This course may be taken as a continuation from the previous semester, or may be limited to only the Spring semester. Note: A research project manual describing the requirements for this project series will be distributed. The student will be expected to acknowledge and agree to the guidelines as delineated.

Prerequisite: Senior standing.     Course Offered: Every Spring

BUSN 150

Personal Financial Planning

3 cr

This course is designed to examine budgeting and sound financial decisions when buying homes, investments, insurance, etc.

Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

BUSN 201

Quantitative Business Analysis

3 cr

This course addresses the vital tools of business management such as statistical applications, sampling, data collecting, simple linear regression, ANOVA, Chi Square.

Prerequisite: MATH 115     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BUSN 211

Principles of Management

3 cr

Management is the process of working with and through people to obtain organizational objectives. The introductory level survey course examines the management functions of organization, controlling, leading and planning. General Systems Theory will be emphasized as an analytical tool. Supervisory behavior and skills will be key topics.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BUSN 212

Principles of Marketing

3 cr

An examination of the fundamental concepts of marketing activities. Takes a managerial perspective to introduce product, price, place and promotion elements of the marketing mix.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BUSN 213

Principles of Finance

3 cr

A basic study of organizational and financial practices and problems which arise in connection with business organizations, especially the corporation. Topics include: the time value of money, basic capital budgeting, basic long-term financing decisions and working capital policy.

Prerequisites: ECON 211, ACCT 201     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BUSN 225

Tourism and Hospitality Marketing

3 cr

This course is about the successful marketing principles employed in the tourism and hospitality industry. Demand variables, distribution channels, communications, promotions, research, packaging, collateral materials, pricing strategies, the marketing plan, and enhancing internal sales may be covered.

BUSN 251

Organizational Behavior

3 cr

A survey course that examines individual and group behavior in an organizational context. The underlying thesis of this course is that an increased understanding of the human system can result in an organization that is more effective at meeting both the organization’s objectives and the goals of the individual employees. Major topics include: motivation, leadership, group processes and attitudes.

Course Offered: Every Spring

BUSN 252

Consumer Behavior

3 cr

Designed to integrate theories of consumer behavior that impact upon an organization’s marketing activities. Explores individual and group behavior factors.

Prerequisites: BUSN 212     Course Offered: Every Spring

BUSN 265

Strategic and Risk Management in the Tourism and Hospitality Industry

3 cr

This course examines risk management concepts and strategies within tourism and hospitality industry. Risk management helps employees to identify, analyze, assess, and hopefully, avoid or mitigate risks coming from a variety of sources, such as financial upset, legal ramifications, accidents, natural disasters, data or cyber security breaches, and many more.

BUSN 301

Conceptual Foundations of Business

3 cr

This course embraces the major ideas and institutions that make up an important part of the environment within which business transactions take place. The ideas are those philosophical concepts which have helped to shape business and society. The institutions include not only business institutions but also those legal and political institutions which have a major bearing on business.

Prerequisite: junior standing

BUSN 310

Marketing Research

3 cr

The methods and techniques of securing, analyzing and interpreting data for effective managerial decision-making will be explored. Focuses on the conceptual design of marketing research studies and the interpretation of data.

Prerequisites: BUSN 212, BUSN 201     Course Offered: Every Fall

BUSN 316

Investments and Portfolio Management

3 cr

Introduction to financial markets, security analysis and valuation, and portfolio management; primary focus from an individual investor viewpoint.

Prerequisite: BUSN 213     Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

BUSN 317

Services Marketing

3 cr

Over half of the GDP in the U.S. comes from service related businesses. Nonprofit organizations (schools, hospitals, churches, etc.) view marketing as an increasingly important function. This course applies marketing principles and techniques to the unique needs of these organizations.

Prerequisite: BUSN 212     Course Offered: Every Fall

BUSN 323

Marketing and Electronic Commerce

3 cr

In this course, students will learn the application of marketing mix (i.e. product, price, distribution and promotion) decisions to electronic commerce. Students will also gain an insight in consumer behavior regarding the use of electronic commerce in purchase decisions.

Prerequisite: BUSN 212

BUSN 325

Organizational Leadership

3 cr

After examining the evolution of leadership theory, this course focuses on a contemporary leadership model. The student’s leadership style will be determined and personal development opportunities will be provided.

Course Offered: Every Fall

BUSN 331

Information Systems

3 cr

This course addresses systems in an operations environment, including computer hardware, software, communications, data bases, data warehousing, data mining, enterprise systems, e-commerce, IS acquisition, product/service development, process analysis, forecasting, capacity and aggregate planning, scheduling, MRP, JIT, inventory management.

Prerequisites: ACCT 202, BUSN 201     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BUSN 355

Business Law

3 cr

Study of the bases of the law and the Uniform Commercial Code, which is most likely to be encountered in a business environment. Topics include contracts, personal property, bailments, sales, torts, government regulation, administrative agencies, corporations, partnerships, commercial paper, insurance, bankruptcy, real property, estates and trusts.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BUSN 403

Legal and Ethical Issues in the Tourism and Hospitality Industry

3 cr

This course is an introduction to the legal and ethical principles that affect the hospitality and tourism industry. Students will review theory and application of general and contract law as they relate to business, employee, and public management regulations. Students will also learn the legal and ethical issues as they relate specifically to the travel and tourism industry.

Crosslisted THMT 403

BUSN 410

Strategic Business Planning

3 cr

This capstone course is concerned with the development of approaches for defining, analyzing and resolving complex strategic problems of profit and not-for-profit organizations. The course should be taken in the last year of the student’s program.

Prerequisite: senior standing     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BUSN 411

Tax, Estate, Trust, and Retirement Planning

3 cr

An examination of planning for and treatment of various estate avenues including wills and trusts, legal and taxation implications, laws of descent and distribution, etc.

Prerequisite: BUSN 213     On-line

BUSN 412

Risk Management & Insurance

3 cr

This course combines major risk management and insurance principles with consumer considerations. Students will study concepts of risk and insurance, basic topics in risk management, functional operations of insurers, legal principles, life and health insurance, auto insurance, property and liability insurance, employee benefits, and social insurance.

Prerequisite: BUSN 213     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

BUSN 420

Marketing Strategies

3 cr

The study of essential aspects of effective marketing strategy formulation and implementation. An appreciation of the complexity of managerial decision-making will be stressed. Emphasis will be on case studies to more fully demonstrate segmentation, targeting, positioning and other marketing mix strategies.

Prerequisite: BUSN 212 and senior standing     Course Offered: Every Spring

BUSN 430

Mastering CRM: Salesforce™ Trailhead Training and Certification

3 cr

The Salesforce certification training course is designed to ensure that students learn and master the concepts of being a Salesforce Administrator and App Builder. This course provides training in Salesforce configuration to collect, analyze, and retrieve vital customer information and create applications using Salesforce Lightning.

BUSN 436

Human Resource Management

3 cr

This course examines the functions performed by human resource professionals in the dynamic environment of the 21st century. Major topics include human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, selection, compensation, benefit administration, performance evaluation and training. Special emphasis will be given to the ethical considerations and legal issues impacting on employment decisions.

Prerequisite: BUSN 211     Course Offered: Every Spring

BUSN 473

Internship in Business

1,2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement

BUSN 474

Internship in Business

1,2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement

CHEM 109

Intro. Chemistry for Non-science Majors

3 cr

Introductory chemistry course for the non-science major emphasizing applications of chemistry to problems involving environmental pollution, sources of energy, radioactivity and human health.

Course Offered: On Demand

CHEM 115

Intro. General, Organic & Biochemistry

3 cr

A one-semester introduction to fundamental chemical principles necessary to describe the behavior of matter. Biochemical concepts and medical applications included as needed. Required for BSN majors. Priority given to health science majors.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

CHEM 141

General Chemistry I

3 cr

Modern concepts of atomic structure and chemical properties, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium and kinetics. Satisfies the general chemistry requirements for chemistry and biology majors as well as prerequisites for medical, veterinary and other health related graduate programs. Placement into MATH 151 or higher required. A drop or withdrawal in the lecture must be matched by a drop or withdrawal in the corresponding laboratory course.

Corequisite: CHEM 142     Course Offered: Every Fall

CHEM 142

General Chemistry Lab I

1 cr

Qualitative and quantitative studies of chemical systems. Introduction to basic synthetic and instrumental chemical methods.

Required: placement into MATH 151 or higher     Corequisite: CHEM 141

CHEM 151

General Chemistry II

3 cr

Modern concepts of atomic structure and chemical properties, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium and kinetics. Satisfies the general chemistry requirements for chemistry and biology majors as well as prerequisites for medical, veterinary and other health related graduate programs. A drop or withdrawal in the lecture must be matched by a drop or withdrawal in the corresponding laboratory course.

Prerequisites: CHEM 141/142     Corequisite: CHEM 152     Course Offered: Every Fall

CHEM 152

General Chemistry Lab II

1 cr

Qualitative and quantitative studies of chemical systems. Introduction to basic synthetic and instrumental chemical methods.

Prerequisites: CHEM 141/142    Corequisite: CHEM 151     Course Offered: Every Spring

CHEM 221

Organic Chemistry I

4 cr

The study of the structure and reactions of organic compounds as described by modern theories of bonding and reactivity.

Prerequisites: CHEM 151 CHEM 152     Corequisite: CHEM 222     Course Offered: Every Fall

CHEM 222

Organic Chemistry Lab I

1 cr

The techniques necessary to synthesize and identify organic compounds by both chemical and instrumental methods.

Prerequisites: CHEM 151 CHEM 152     Corequisite: CHEM 221     Course Offered: Every Fall

CHEM 231

Organic Chemistry II

4 cr

The study of the structure and reactions of organic compounds as described by modern theories of bonding and reactivity.

Prerequisites: CHEM 221 and CHEM 222    Corequisite: CHEM 232     Course Offered: Every Spring

CHEM 232

Organic Chemistry Lab II

1 cr

The techniques necessary to synthesize and identify organic compounds by both chemical and instrumental methods.

Prerequisites: CHEM 221 and CHEM 222    Corequisite: CHEM 231     Course Offered: Every Spring

CHEM 314

Biochemistry

3 cr

A basic course which develops concepts necessary for a description of macromolecular structure, biological regulatory processes and chemical biodynamics.

Prerequisite: CHEM 231     Course Offered: On Demand

CHEM 315

Quantitative Analysis

3 cr

Principles of quantitative analysis with a general introduction to instrumental methods. Emphasis on development of analytic skills as currently employed.

Prerequisite: CHEM 221, 222, 231, 232     Corequisite: CHEM 316     Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

CHEM 316

Quantitative Analysis Lab

1 cr

A laboratory course involving the principles of quantitative analysis and an introduction to instrumental methods.

Prerequisite: CHEM 221, 222, 231, 232     Corequisite: CHEM 315     Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

CHEM 317

Instrumental Analysis

3 cr

A lecture course in the theory and application of modern instrumental methods of separation and analysis.

Prerequisites: CHEM 315, 316, PHYS 141/142, PHYS 241/242     Corequisite: CHEM 318     Course Offered: Spring of every even year

CHEM 318

Instrumental Analysis Lab

1 cr

A laboratory course in the theory and application of modern instrumental methods of separation and analysis.

Prerequisites: CHEM 315, 316, PHYS 141/142, PHYS 241/242     Corequisite: CHEM 317     Course Offered: Spring of every even year

CHEM 319

Environmental Chemistry

3 cr

Basic chemistry of soils, atmosphere and natural waters. Changes resulting from pollution discharges. Chemical perspectives on environmental problems.

Prerequisite: CHEM 221 and 222     Course Offered: On Demand

CHEM 321

Physical Chemistry

4 cr

Modern concepts of molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, equilibrium and kinetics.

Prerequisites: CHEM 151, 152, 231, and 232, and MATH 192     Corequisite: CHEM 322     Course Offered: Fall of every even year

CHEM 322

Physical Chemistry Lab I

1 cr

Experiments in physical-chemical measurements with an emphasis on instrumental methods.

Prerequisites: CHEM 151, 152, 231, and 232, and MATH 192     Corequisite: CHEM 321     Course Offered: Fall of every even year

CHEM 331

Physical Chemistry II

4 cr

Modern concepts of molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, equilibrium and kinetics.

Prerequisites: CHEM 321 and 322     Corequisite: CHEM 332     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

CHEM 332

Physical Chemistry Lab II

1 cr

Experiments in physical-chemical measurements with an emphasis on instrumental methods.

Prerequisites: CHEM 321 and 322     Corequisite: CHEM 331     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

CHEM 382

Junior Research Project I

1 cr

Directed research projects. A seminar and/or written report are integral parts of each course.

Prerequisite: Junior standing as a chemistry major    Course Offered: Every Fall

CHEM 383

Junior Research Project II

1 cr

Directed research projects. A seminar and/or written report are integral parts of each course.

Prerequisite: Junior standing as a chemistry major     Course Offered: Every Spring

CHEM 401

Inorganic Chemistry

3 cr

Modern concepts of bonding and structure in inorganic compounds, reactivity and reaction mechanisms, acid-base and solid state chemistry.

Prerequisite: CHEM 231     Corequisite: CHEM 402    Course Offered: Fall of every even year

CHEM 402

Inorganic Chemistry Lab

1 cr

A laboratory course providing experience in the synthesis of significant inorganic compounds and the techniques of various experimental and spectroscopic methods.

Corequisite: CHEM 401    Course Offered: Fall of every even year

CHEM 481

Seminar

1 cr

Seminar presentations by faculty and chemists from industry and other academic institutions; student presentations on their undergraduate research and literature topics.

Prerequisite: Senior standing as major or permission     Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

CHEM 482

Senior Research Project I

1 cr

Directed research projects. A seminar and/or written report are integral parts of each course.

Prerequisite: Senior standing as a chemistry major     Course Offered: Every Fall

CHEM 483

Senior Research Project II

1 cr

Directed research projects. A seminar and/or written report are integral parts of each course.

Prerequisite: Senior standing as a chemistry major     Course Offered: Every Spring

CMGT 110

Introduction to Construction Management

3 cr

This course introduces students to the construction industry with emphasis on the principles of construction management.

CMGT 210

Construction Materials and Methods

3 cr

A study of the origins, production and uses of construction materials such as concrete, steel, aluminum, wood, brick, and stone. A combination of structural and non-structural, interior and exterior materials and assemblies will be examined.

CMGT 273

Internship: Applied Practice in Construction Management

3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement

CMGT 274

Internship: Applied Practice in Construction Management

3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement

COMM 115

Principles of Professional Speaking

3 cr

This course provides an overview of effective speaking techniques in a variety of settings and emphasizes communicating messages to different audiences. Students demonstrate public speaking concepts and principles to compose informative and persuasive speeches. While primarily performance based, students also critique memorable speeches through their observation and application of course content. Core: EC

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

COMM 120

Principles of Communication

3 cr

This course provides an overview of the field of communication and how scholars analyze concepts and principles of human communication. Students understand how verbal and nonverbal messages communicate meaning in relationships, small group settings, and other cultures. Students examine their perceptions of themselves and others, effective listening techniques, and the role of media in their lives. Finally, public speaking ideas, such as audience analysis, informative and persuasive speaking, and delivery are also addressed.

Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

COMM 121

Persuasion

3 cr

Students in this course survey mass communication strategies and modern communication, and theories of communication failure. This class builds practical persuasive skills by teaching students to analyze and understand persuasive discourse, broadly considered. Students examine propaganda, twentieth-century marketing strategies, and demagoguery.

Course Offered: Fall of every even year

COMM 131

Media and Culture

3 cr

Using theories and research methods from cultural studies and rhetorical studies, students learn to critically analyze culture and its textual artifacts to understand how texts and culture shape and inform one another. Students study media production, representation, and audience responses when analyzing and critically evaluating media. The course considers books, magazines, newspapers, music, film, television, advertising, and the Internet.

Course Offered: Spring of every even year

COMM 142

Digital Photography

cr

This course introduces students to the history, aesthetics, and principles of photography with an emphasis on the rhetoric of digital photography. Students will explore the creation of their photography by learning the principles of composition, lighting, exposure, and special effects. This course has no prerequisites but requires the use of a digital camera with manual settings. Prerequisites: None. Core: CC.

Course Offered: Every Fall

COMM 151

Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication

3 cr

This course introduces students to the theoretical perspectives and relational dynamics of interpersonal communication. Students emphasize building, maintaining, and sustaining familial, business and professional, friendly, and romantic relationships through verbal and nonverbal communication. They will also analyze the presence of conflict and discuss conflict management techniques. Finally, consideration of how social media has altered how we communicate with others will also be addressed.

Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

COMM 161

Fundamentals of Journalism

3 cr

Students study the principles and practices of journalism in a democratic society through the use of various platforms. This course examines and practices the skills of gathering information and writing ethical news and feature stories with precision, balance, and insight. This course emphasizes reporting techniques including investigative reporting, observing, interviewing, and broadcasting, as well as producing journalism stories for print and online, journalism blogs, and television broadcasts. Students produce several stories for their portfolios.

Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

COMM 204

Argumentation & Debate

3 cr

In this speech-based class, students learn and evaluate the types of arguments and how to build them using credible evidence. Using claims, propositions, credible evidence and reasoning, students examine how to improve their arguments. Recognizing opposing viewpoints and considering how to create refutations are also examined. In this primarily performance-based course, students professionally debate each other using a variety of topics and contexts.

Prerequisite: COMM 115     Course Offered: Fall of every even year

COMM 208

Intercultural Communication

3 cr

This course examines the core concepts, principles, and theoretical history of intercultural communication. Students examine how a culture is contextualized, constructed, and transformed. Cultural beliefs and values are also considered, as well as how dynamics in communication and cultural diversity are present in the global world. Students recognize how rhetoric, media messages, interpersonal relationships, and political contexts affect intercultural communication.

Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

COMM 221

Topics in Communication I

3 cr

This course focuses on selected topics or subject areas within the Communication field. Topics may derive from Communication subjects such as, but not limited to, media studies, critical/cultural studies, media production, rhetoric, and persuasive messages.

Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

COMM 222

Topics in Communication II

3 cr

This course focuses on selected topics or subject areas within the Communication field. Topics may derive from Communication subjects such as, but not limited to, media studies, critical/cultural studies, media production, rhetoric, and persuasive messages.

Course Offered: Fall of every even year

COMM 232

Visual Design

3 cr

In this process-based, workshop-style course, students will learn the basics of creating visual design in the areas of page layout, typography, and digital image editing. Students will learn how to use graphic elements such as geometric primitives, line, shape, texture, value, color, positive and negative space, foreshortening, and perspective.

Course Offered: Spring of every even year

COMM 259

Advertising

3 cr

Students study and practice advertising as a critical element of an organization’s total marketing plan. This course emphasizes the analysis and critique of previous advertisements and their effectiveness in message creation, audience analysis, persuasion, and ethical considerations. Students produce ads for print, broadcast and other media by creating effective and ethical examples of advertisements.

Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

COMM 303

Race, Gender, and Class in Media

3 cr

This media studies course examines representations of race, gender, and class in the media. Students study how race, gender, and class are portrayed in media texts such as film, television, advertisements, and music videos. This course examines how the dominant ideologies associated with these media messages influence our cultural beliefs, perceptions of others, and broader hegemonic themes in society. Students consider to what extent media portrayals participate in the larger discussion of these themes in a democratic society.

Pre-requisites: COMM 120; COMM 131     Course Offered: Spring of every even year

COMM 311

Public Relations

3 cr

Students in this course study and produce the kinds of planning and writing required for effective public relations, including story pitches, news releases, brochures, public service announcements, presentations, speeches, Web sites, and media kits. This course emphasizes not only the various tools available to the public relations practitioner but also the rhetorical process of deciding and justifying which tools are most effective for moving target audiences from initial ignorance to the appropriate intended action.

Pre-requisites: COMM 120; COMM 121     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

COMM 330

Communication Research Methods

3 cr

This course introduces students to the methods and analysis techniques utilized by Communication researchers. Students examine social scientific, interpretive/humanistic, and critical perspectives through quantitative and qualitative research methods. Finally, students critique previous Communication research as well as develop their own research proposal.

Pre-requisites: COMM 120; COMM 131     Course Offered: Fall of every even year

COMM 351

Integrated Marketing Communication

3 cr

This advanced course seeks to develop critical thinking skills through the examination of audience-centered case studies of how professionals in public relations and integrated communications develop objectives that translate into communication campaigns. The course emphasizes illustrations of theoretical applications in real-life situations. The development of analytical skills, ethical guidelines, and issues of diversity in communications practice are emphasized.

COMM 473

Internship in Communications

1, 2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement. Repeat up to 6 crs

COMM 474

Internship in Communications

1, 2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement. Repeat up to 6 crs

COMM 481

Senior Seminar

3 cr

This course is a guided experience creating a senior capstone project that is the culmination of the student’s studies in the Communication major. A project will be related to the student’s post-graduation roles and will be presented at Research Day in the spring. Students also finalize a professional portfolio of work that they can show to potential employers or use for graduate school applications.

Pre requisites: COMM 120     Course Offered: Every Spring

CRJU 120

Survey of Criminology

3 cr

Looks at theoretical approaches to criminal behavior and the controversies arising from them. Modern criminal justice policies and the ideologies that lie behind them are applied to the problems of crime control and the sentencing of criminal offenders.

Course Offered: Every Fall

CRJU 121

Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

3 cr

Surveys patterns of crime and the processes of the American justice system. Crime, law enforcement, judicial process and corrections are examined from political, sociological and psychological perspectives.

Course Offered: Every Spring

CRJU 212

Criminal Law and Procedure

3 cr

The basic principles of substantive criminal law are illustrated through analysis of cases. Topics include the elements of crimes against persons and property, the fundamentals of criminal liability and justifications and excuses such as self-defense and insanity. Problems of advocacy at both trial and appellate levels are also explored.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement     Course Offered: On Demand

CRJU 215

Law Enforcement

3 cr

Provides a social science perspective on the training and socialization of police, police corruption, police community relations and the pressures of police work. The fundamentals of criminal procedure are also covered, including arrest, search and seizure and the use of deadly force.

Prerequisite: CRJU 120     Course Offered: On Demand

CRJU 216

Justice and Diversity

3 cr

An introduction to basic terminology and theories of justice, gender, race, and identity, with particular attention to the voices and experiences of those whose difference from a dominant social identity has been a factor in their marginalization.

CRJU 250

Criminal Investigations

3 cr

This course examines the roles played by criminal investigators, with emphasis on legal restrictions and principles. Students will apply laws and court decisions to the tasks that comprise criminal investigations, such as interrogation, evidence collection, and surveillance. This course examines special investigative challenges such as death investigations and arson cases. The course also allows students to develop and practice certain skills commonly possessed by professional investigators.

Prerequisite: CRJU 121

CRJU 312

The Juvenile Justice System

3 cr

Analyzes theories of the causes of juvenile crime and the processes of the juvenile justice system, including a critical look at juvenile correctional policies.

Prerequisite: CRJU 120     Course Offered: On Demand

CRJU 318

Occupational Crime

3 cr

Examination of conduct in violation of the law that is committed through opportunities created in the course of a legal occupation. Methods for counting and regarding occupational crimes and criminals. Theories and explanations of these behaviors. Sanctioning and social control of occupational crime.

Course Offered: Fall of every even year

CRJU 320

Drugs

3 cr

This course examines the impact of illegal drugs on both the individual and the overall criminal Justice system. Students will consider the physiological impact of illegal drugs on the user, and will review the different categories of drugs. Students will explore the mechanics of the illegal drug trade, with an eye toward understanding how drug trafficking organizations work, and how drugs move from place to place. The course will conclude with a look at law enforcement efforts, and the movement to legalize.

CRJU 321

Corrections

3 cr

Examines American correctional policies and their historical development. Provides a close look at both community-based and institutional corrections, as well as the processes of probation and parole and the legal rights of prisoners.

Prerequisite: CRJU 120 Course Offered: On Demand

CRJU 327

Comparative Systems of Justice and Social Control

3 cr

Introduction to the concepts of justice, law, deviance and social control. Examination of information and formal systems of justice and social control, including traditional systems, common law, civil law, Marxist law and Islamic law.

Course Offered: On Demand

CRJU 330

Criminal Profiling

3 cr

This course examines the techniques and processes involved in the investigation of unusually violent crimes, with a focus on the process of criminal profiling. Students will explore a wide range of crimes with multiple victims, and investigate the motivations and causes behind these tragedies. Students will conduct several in-depth case studies, with a goal of developing investigative profiles of the perpetrators.

Course Prerequisites: CRJU-120 or PSYC-110

CRJU 333

Organized Crime

3 cr

This course reviews the history of organized crime groups in America. Students will explore the structure of various types of organized crime groups, including the ethnic organizations in New York, Boston, and other cities, as well as drug cartels and international smuggling organizations. The course will also examine the legal and law enforcement efforts to combat organized crime, including RICO prosecutions.

CRJU 340

Issues in Criminal Justice

3 cr

Analysis of specific topics, depending on student interest and current importance; examples include the international war on drugs, causes and effects of domestic violence.

Prerequisite: CRJU 120     Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

CRJU 350

Terrorism and Homeland Security

3 cr

This course examines the agencies tasked with the mission of protecting America from threats, and the methods these agencies employ. Threats include terrorism as well as natural disasters, disease, and other large-scale threats. Students will examine major terrorist groups, including domestic groups. Students will also examine several terrorist incidents as case studies, to consider terror groups’ motivations and methods, as well as investigative strategies.

CRJU 410

Ethics

3 cr

This course introduces the student to prominent ethical systems, then applies those concepts to specific aspects of the Criminal Justice field. Students will analyze the ethical challenges that arise in the fields of law enforcement, courts, and corrections in particular, and explore the methods designed to mitigate ethical problems in these areas.

Prerequisites: CRJU-121, CRJU-212, CRJU-215 CRJU-321

CRJU 421

Theories of Management and Administration in Criminal Justice Organizations

3 cr

Focus on the complex theories and related issues of management and administration within the criminal justice system. Problems of communication, motivation, leadership, organizational effectiveness and innovation.

Prerequisites: CRJU 120     Course Offered: On Demand

CRJU 450

The Supreme Court and Criminal Justice

3 cr

This course examines the role of the Supreme Court and its impact on the Criminal Justice system. Students will explore how the Court is structured and how it operates. The course reviews landmark decisions that have shaped the modern system with regard to law enforcement, corrections, and criminal procedures. Students will also monitor present-day cases being argued before the Court and analyze their potential impacts.

CRJU 473

Internship in Criminal Justice

1, 2, or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.

CRJU 474

Internship in Criminal Justice

1, 2, or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.

DPT 601-80

Basic Science I

2 cr

Medical Terminology
This six-week intensive online course investigates medical specialties and body systems as facilitated by the study of medical terminology.

DPT 602-80

Clinical Science I

1 cr

The curriculum in the Department of Physical Therapy is based on the Problem-Based Learning philosophy of learning. The Doctor of Physical Therapy program utilizes an integrated approach in which all learning is driven by the patient/client cases.  The core of this type of learning is the tutorial process.  In this online course, the theoretical basis of this style of learning, including the assumptions that underlie the process, will be investigated.  The process and the roles that individuals take in professional discussion will be explained.  Group dynamics will also be discussed.

DPT 603-80

Physical Therapy Science I

2 cr

This course is designed to allow the student to bring forward anatomy knowledge previously learned in prerequisite coursework and to apply it to the practice of physical therapy.  This will be accomplished through six weekly online modules that will guide the student through the basics of anatomical surface palpation of bony structures, muscles, their actions, and attachments.  These tasks and principles will be applied to the trunk and extremities using another person on whom to practice.  Competence will be evaluated through the use of quizzes, assignments, and comprehensive multiple-choice midterm and final examinations.

DPT 604-80

Professional Issues I

1 cr

Introduction to the Profession of Physical Therapy
This course will define and describe professionalism as it applies to the profession of physical therapy.  It will provide the student with the expectation of what a graduate of our physical therapy program should demonstrate with respect to professionalism in their daily practice as a physical therapist.  In addition, a working knowledge of the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice and specific resources relating to professionalism, available through the American Physical Therapy Association’s web page, will be presented.

DPT 611

Basic Science II

5 cr

This course guides students to study structures and functions of the body in healthy and impaired states; the impact of health care evaluations and interventions on structures and functions of the human body. This course includes study of bones, joints, muscles, peripheral nerves, connective tissues, body composition, circulation and energy management, related biomechanics of the body and posture in static and ambulation, principles of exercise prescription for general health, fitness, and in disease states. Topics are integrated closely with client cases introduced in Clinical Science II. This course uses the Problem-Based Learning approach, and students will be encouraged to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills, as well as begin to develop the ability to use scientific literature to discuss evidence-based approaches in the relevant topics.

DPT 612

Clinical Science II

5 cr

Problem-Based tutorial using the Patient/Client Management Model as a basis to explore the application of physical therapy for a variety of pathologies, impairments, and functional limitations and participation restrictions. Emphasis on the foundations of normal movement, categories of interference with normal movement, and application of principles of evidence-based practice of physical therapy in the evaluation and treatment of specific conditions resulting in the impairment of body structures or functions, activity limitations, participation restrictions, or disabilities are explored. The instructor will guide the student in the acquisition of professional behaviors and facilitate clinical reasoning and decision-making.

DPT 613

Physical Therapy Science II

5 cr

This course is a Problem-Based course using the Patient/Client Management Model and the Normative Model as bases to explore the application of physical therapy for a variety of pathologies, impairments, and functional limitations.  Orientation to basic physical therapy assessment and treatment procedures will be utilized in individual and small group activities, which include the learning of qualitative (e.g. observation, palpation.) and quantitative (measurement) tools necessary for clinical practice.  The activities will be closely related to the patient/client cases presented in Clinical Science II.

DPT 615

Integrated Seminar I

1 cr

Lecture and group discussions on the information presented in the term as it relates to the patient/client management of the cases presented in Clinical Science II and the practice of physical therapy. Pass/Fail.

DPT 616

Research & Evidence-Based Practice I

2.5 cr

This course presents the role of research in development and critical analysis of physical therapy practice through introducing the American Physical Therapy Association vision on training the next generation of Physical Therapy profession in the Scientist-Practitioner model. In this course, the philosophy behind the scientific and clinical research including causation, and the pillars of Evidence-Based Practice, their importance for future practitioners and their application as it relates to Physical Therapy practice are emphasized. This course also introduces overall organization and elements of a clinical research project, principles of hypothesis writing, and basic statistical and epidemiological concepts. It also provides an opportunity to practice data entry and running descriptive statistics in SPSS. Components of the class are directed self-reading of documented research, understanding good research design, research variables, basics of descriptive analysis, and computing them on SPSS. Students will be directed to work with a faculty member to develop their research topic and write “Chapter 1-Intorduction'' of their research project.

DPT 617

Service Learning I

1 cr

This course will provide physical therapy students with the opportunity to evaluate and serve the needs of the local community utilizing basic examination and treatment skills under faculty supervision. The students will evaluate their role as health professionals and as citizens to promote positive change within their community. Pass/Fail.

DPT 618

Professional Issues II

1 cr

This is the second course in the thread of Professional Issues. This course will focus on American Physical Therapy Association issues (Core Values, Code of Ethics, and life-long membership), professionalism matters (technology, health care informatics, social media, professional responsibilities, ethics, professional relationships, verbal/nonverbal/written communication, life-long learning), clinical education topics (clinical settings and what to expect, clinical education experience expectations, CPR/First Aid/Emergency Codes/Safety, HIPAA/standard precautions, database training), and clinical performance areas (generational differences, teaching and learning for patients and as a clinical instructor, teaching and learning styles related to conflict management, communication with various stakeholders, leadership).

DPT 621

Basic Science III

5 cr

This course is a study of the structures and functions of the body’s systems in healthy and impaired states which is guided by the course instructor. Additionally, the impact of health care evaluations and interventions on structures and functions of the body will be discovered while incorporating the Evidence-Based Practice model. In this course, students will be encouraged to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills, as well as begin to develop the ability to use scientific literature to discuss evidence-based approaches in the relevant topics. Topics are integrated closely with patient/client case scenarios in Clinical Science III.

DPT 622

Clinical Science III

5 cr

Problem-Based tutorial using the Patient/Client Management Model as a basis to explore the application of physical therapy for a variety of pathologies, impairments, functional limitations, and participation restrictions.  Emphasis on the foundations of normal movement, categories of interference with normal movement, and application of principles of evidence-based practice of physical therapy in the evaluation and treatment of specific conditions resulting in the impairment of body structures or functions, activity limitations, participation restriction, or disabilities are explored. The instructors will facilitate clinical reasoning and decision-making to guide the student in the acquisition of clinical reasoning.

DPT 623

Physical Therapy Science III

5 cr

Practical experiences in evaluation and intervention strategies for selected impairments in movement. Topics are related closely to patient/client cases presented in Clinical Science III.

DPT 625

Integrated Seminar II

1 cr

A variety of topics, reviews, podcasts, speakers as available, and labs that will address case and semester relevant information and issues as pertain to the content of this term’s courses. Pass/Fail.

DPT 626

Research & Evidence-Based Practice II

2.5 cr

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop the methods section (Chapter 3) of their research project with the guidance of the research advisors. Relevant contents like sampling methods and participants selection, reliability, validity, and threats to research will be discussed. In this course, students will also be introduced to the process of paper appraisal/research critique, ethical issues in clinical research and human subject protection, components of consent form, and Institutional Review Board process. Students are required to complete Institutional Review Board training modules, and ultimately submit completed research methods and the proposal (combining Chapters 1 and 3) to the Institutional Review Board.

DPT 627

Service Learning II

1 cr

This course will provide physical therapy students with the opportunity to evaluate and serve the needs of the local community utilizing basic examination and treatment skills under faculty supervision. The students will evaluate their role as health professionals and as citizens to promote positive change within their community.  Pass/Fail.

DPT 630

Professional Issues III

1 cr

This is the third course in the thread of Professional Issues. This course will focus on legal practice issues (direct access, state practice acts, supervision guidelines in the clinic as a student physical therapist, documentation in the clinic as a student physical therapist, billing considerations, fraud and abuse, working with a physical therapist assistant and other physical therapy personnel), professionalism matters (mission of the university, program, and profession, World Physical Therapy Day, advocating for the profession through participation in professional, community, legislative activities, state and national association membership and leadership, professional conferences), clinical education experience topics (preparation for clinical education experiences, professional flow chart, professional portfolio, professionalism in the clinic, clinical education experiences focus group meeting), and clinical performance areas (using American Physical Therapy Association resources in the clinic as a student physical therapist, clinical performance tool use in the clinic, minimum skills required for entry-level clinical practice, residency and fellowship, board-certified specializations, and professional certifications).

DPT 631

Basic Science IV

5 cr

Study of structures and functions of the body in healthy and impaired states, the impact of health care evaluations and interventions on structures and functions.  Includes study of basic physiology and pathology of the nervous system.  Topics are integrated closely with patient/client cases in Clinical Science IV.

DPT 632

Clinical Science IV

5 cr

Problem-Based tutorial includes the study of patient/client cases illustrating an increasingly complex variety of causes and manifestations of movement dysfunction. Cases incorporate an array of ethical, social, psychological, communication, and economic issues.

DPT 633

Physical Therapy Science IV

5 cr

Laboratory experience in patient management and intervention strategies for selected impairments in movement.  Topics related closely to patient/client cases presented in Clinical Science IV.

DPT 634-80

Professional Issues IV

2.5 cr

The course introduces the student to the historical development, structure, operation, and major components of the American health care delivery system and the federal laws that influence the practice of physical therapy. The course examines the ways in which health care services have developed, are organized and delivered, the influences that impact healthcare delivery decisions, and factors that determine the allocation of healthcare resources. The course provides the student with a basic understanding of the structure and function of the system in which they will work as a licensed health care provider, enabling them to work as an effective team member.

DPT 635

Integrated Seminar III

1 cr

Lecture and group discussions on the information presented in the term as it relates to the patient/client management of the cases presented in Clinical Science IV and the practice of physical therapy. Pass/Fail.

DPT 636-80

Research & Evidence-Based Practice III

1 cr

This course is a continuation of the research track that builds up the scientific search methods, critical evaluation of the literature, and the skills of summarizing literature into a scientific writing. Primary goal of this course is the completion of Chapter 2 (Review of Literature). Students are also required to update Chapter 3 (Methods and Materials) that is proposed in Term III, if any changes are necessary. It requires the students to finalize the methods and procedure for collecting data that will be gathered in Research & Evidence Based Practice IV as continues in Term V. Additionally, students are required to complete necessary paperwork to submit a full proposal to the Institutional Review Board for approval, if not already approved. Students are also provided with the knowledge of ethical aspects of performing research on human subjects through Institutional Review Board training modules. A final version of Chapters 1-3 (Introduction, Review of Literature, and Methods) of the research project and the completed Institutional Review Board application paperwork will be submitted to the faculty research advisor. 

DPT 637-01/02

Service Learning III

1 cr

Students will accompany faculty to community organizations, which have need for services from our department. These arrangements are mutually beneficial to the community and to the educational goals of our academic program. Students will gain basic communication, screening, examination, treatment, and documentation skills. Pass/Fail. (Regional Experience)

  • 637-01 – Appalachia Public Health
    This course will provide physical therapy students with the opportunity to observe, understand, and serve the needs of the Appalachian community utilizing their skills in public health education.    The students will evaluate their role as health professionals and as citizens to promote positive change within their community. 
  • 637-02 – Camp Gizmo
    This course will provide students with the opportunity to evaluate and serve the needs of the regional community utilizing basic examination and treatment skills, team meetings, and project completion under faculty supervision.    The students will evaluate their role as health professionals and as citizens to promote positive change within their community.  Patients will have the right to consent to treatment which includes student participation.  If the patient requests that students not be present for their physical therapy session, this will be honored.

DPT 638

Clinical Education I

6 cr

Supervised clinical practice of physical therapy skills learned in the preceding terms.  (eight weeks – three hundred twenty hours)

DPT 640

Research & Evidence-Based Practice IV

1 cr

This hybrid course is a continuation of the research track. In this term, students are required to finalize the tools that will be needed, and to initiate data collection of the research project. This course will provide the required knowledge to manage the collected data, and guidance on the relevant data analysis process. Students will be guided on how to interpret their findings and formulate it in the Results section. At the end, the course will be culminated by submitting a written status of the research plan and timeline for completion of the research due to the research advisor. 

DPT 641

Basic Science V

3 cr

Study of structures and functions of the body in healthy and impaired states, the impact of health care evaluations, and interventions on structures and functions.  Includes study of complex pathologic conditions.  Topics are integrated closely with patient/client cases in Clinical Science V.

DPT 642

Clinical Science V

3 cr

Problem-Based tutorial includes the study of patient/client cases illustrating multiple simultaneous and sequential causes and manifestations of movement dysfunction.  Cases incorporate an array of ethical, social, psychological, communication, and economic issues.

DPT 643

Physical Therapy Science V

3 cr

Laboratory experiences in evaluation and intervention strategies for selected impairments in movement. Topics are related closely to patient/client cases presented in Clinical Science V.

DPT 644-80

Professional Issues V

1.5 cr

Emphasis of this course is on legal and ethical issues that influence the practice of physical therapy, cultural competence, and leadership.  The student will learn the common federal laws that influence the practice of physical therapy and gain a basic understanding of the various aspects of being a professional (e.g. by adhering to rules and regulations, and being culturally aware).  In addition, the student will develop a marketing plan to aid in their professional development and career planning.  Orientation to health care marketing and strategic planning will be covered.

DPT 645

Integrated Seminar IV

1 cr

Material is presented to integrate and clarify information for each case during the term. The material is presented by faculty or by guest speakers to assist the students in comprehension of specific concepts. Pass/Fail.

DPT 650

Research & Evidence-Based Practice V

1 cr

In this course students will complete data collection and data analysis.  They will start constructing their Results section based on the data analysis of their research project. At the end, the course will be culminated by submitting a written draft of the Results chapter due to the research advisor. 

DPT 651

Basic Science VI

3 cr

Study of structures and functions of the body in healthy and impaired states, the impact of health care evaluations, and interventions on structures and functions.  Includes study of complex pathologic conditions.  Topics are integrated closely with patient/client cases in Clinical Science VI.

DPT 652

Clinical Science VI

3 cr

Problem-Based tutorial includes the study of patient/client cases illustrating multiple simultaneous and sequential causes and manifestations of movement dysfunction. Cases incorporate an array of ethical, social, psychological, communication, and economic issues.

DPT 653

Physical Therapy Science VI

3 cr

Laboratory experiences in evaluation and intervention strategies for selected impairments in movement. Topics are related closely to patient/client cases presented in Clinical Science VI.

DPT 654

Professional Issues VI

1.5 cr

Orientation to health care organizations including the personnel function, management of physical facilities, quality assurance and risk management, budgeting, marketing, and planning. Discussion, small group projects and presentations of projects are used to promote learning. Independent individual projects completed during the term are presented in written format.

DPT 655

Integrated Seminar V

1 cr

The primary goal of this course is to prepare students for the comprehensive exams; eventually for the NPTE Board exam. This is a crash course providing students with the opportunity to self-evaluate their knowledge of each body systems through the BaseCamp platform from Scorebuilders. By doing this self-evaluation, students will improve their comprehensive testing skills and synthesize an appropriate study plan to prepare for the Board exam. Additional topic of ImPACT test related to the Clinical Science VI case scenario will also be covered by a guest lecturer. Pass/Fail

DPT 657-01/02/03

Service Learning IV

2 cr

This course will provide physical therapy students with the opportunity to evaluate and serve the needs of an international community utilizing basic examination and treatment skills under faculty supervision. The students will evaluate their role as a global citizen, as well as a health professional and develop an appreciation for the cultural practices of people in Central or South America. Pass/Fail. (International Experience)

DPT 658

Clinical Education II

6 cr

Supervised clinical practice of physical therapy skills learned in the preceding terms. (eight weeks – three hundred twenty hours) 

DPT 660-80

Research & Evidence-Based Practice VI

1 cr

In this course students will complete the Results and Conclusion sections, and will compile all chapters into a completed final version of their research project. They will also design, present, and defend a professional poster, which will include the Results section and Conclusion of their research project and the clinical implications of the entire study. This course will culminate with an oral defense and a Capstone in the form of an open platform presentation. A final paper prepared as a manuscript ready for publication and a poster is required to be submitted to the research advisor. 

Students are required to choose a suitable forum for submission of their paper and follow the guidelines for submission for that publication

DPT 668a

Clinical Education III

8 cr

Supervised clinical practice of physical therapy skills learned during the preceding terms. (ten weeks – four hundred hours) 

DPT 668b

Clinical Education IV

8 cr

Supervised clinical practice of physical therapy skills learned during the preceding terms. (ten weeks – four hundred hours)

DPT 675

NPTE Board Review Course

3 cr

This course is a six-week online review course designed to help students prepare for the National Physical Therapy Examination.  This course will cover test strategies, as well as key topics related to Examination, Evaluation, Differential Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Interventions.

ECON 211

Macroeconomics

3 cr

A presentation of basic macroeconomic relationships. Topics emphasized are: the determination of income and employment, monetary and fiscal policies, inflation, interest rates and economic growth.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ECON 212

Microeconomics

3 cr

A presentation of basic theories of consumer behavior and of the firm. Other topics include: study of elasticity, firm and industry equilibrium under various market structures and international trade.

Prerequisite: ECON 211     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

EDUC 210

Educational Technology

3 cr

Experiences in teaching in technology, with technology, and through technology by incorporating hands-on work with computers and associated peripherals, the Internet, and content software. Strategies for effective integration of technology and the security and ethical issues associated with technology are included.

EDUC 223

Curriculum Development & Methods: Physical Education, Health, and Safety

2 cr

Experiential examination of physical and emotional fitness, contemporary health issues, and the integration of physical education, health, and safety in multi-subject, K-6 classrooms.

EDUC 231

Schools and Communities

2 cr

Introduction to teaching as a profession with an emphasis on exploring various perspectives on education through dialogue and activities related to current issues relevant to today’s classroom teachers. Topics include teacher dispositions, challenges teachers and schools face, influence of the law on education, standards and assessment, and the global educational context. The field component involves tutoring and/or leading learning activities with children. (10 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

EDUC 232

Classroom and Teacher Roles

3 cr

Study of teaching, focusing on classroom pedagogical and management strategies, development of objectives, and lesson planning, as well as discussion of the various roles of a teacher. Attention also given to co-teaching and collaboration. The field component involves observation and teaching experience under the guidance of a K-12 mentor teacher. There is a focus on reflections related to planning, pacing, and teaching strategies. (30 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

EDUC 310

Curriculum Development & Methods: Secondary English/Language Arts

3 cr

Study of English/Language Arts curriculum, incorporating specific methods to prepare students to teach secondary English/Language Arts. (40 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 311

Curriculum Development & Methods: Secondary Mathematics & Science

3 cr

117 Study of mathematics and science curriculum, incorporating specific methods to prepare students to teach secondary math and science. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 312

Curriculum Development & Methods: Secondary Social Studies

3 cr

Study of Social Studies curriculum incorporating specific methods to prepare students to teach secondary Social Studies. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program

EDUC 313

Mathematics Education Residency I

4 cr

This course will focus on the West Virginia College - and Career - Readiness Standards for Mathematics (2520.2B) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics CAEP Standards. Students will study and practice the mathematical standards in the following areas: algebra, geometry, trigonometry, probability, statistics, and calculus. Students will complete math assignments, Discussion Board posts, and reflections. In addition to observing lessons, students will assist the mentor teacher with classroom tutoring. Tutoring will involve helping individual and small groups completion or of students with homework other support activities assigned by the classroom teacher. (60 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required).

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 314

Mathematics Education Residency II

4 cr

This course will focus on the West Virginia College - and Career - Readiness Standards for Mathematics (2520.2B) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics CAEP Standards. Students will study and practice the mathematical standards in the following areas: algebra, geometry, trigonometry, probability, statistics, and calculus. Students will complete math assignments, Discussion Board posts, and reflections. In addition to observing lessons, students will assist the mentor teacher with classroom tutoring. Tutoring will involve helping individual and small groups completion or of students with homework other support activities assigned by the classroom teacher. (60 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required).

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 316

Grammar

3 cr

Study of grammar and instructional strategies for teaching the conventions of language. Focus is on integrating the teaching of grammar in the context of writing activities. Students will analyze their own writing and develop instructional strategies for incorporating grammar into the K-6 curriculum. Required of all Elementary Education and secondary English majors.

EDUC 320

The Special Education Process

3 cr

Study of the history of special education incorporating significant legislation, litigation, and trends. Important practices, including the referral process, functional behavior assessments, transition plans, 504 plans, IEPs, and the continuum of classroom services. (30 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required).

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 322

Teaching Reading & Phonics in the Elementary School

4 cr

Theories and strategies of the teaching of reading grounded in field experiences with emphasis on techniques for thematic teaching of reading/language arts. The course includes the assessment and instruction process through construction, administration, and interpretation of authentic reading and written language assessments. Diagnostic and corrective reading techniques are integrated into the instructional process. Field experience includes observation and teaching experience under the guidance of a mentor teacher and University supervisor with a focus on teaching practice in reading and language arts. . (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 323

Curriculum Development & Methods: Art Through Children’s Literature

2 cr

Integrated theoretical and hands-on experience designed to prepare a student to work in a multi-subject, K-6 classroom. The course provides application of visual art by drawing examples from and parallels to children’s literature and the theories of each. Projects integrate visual arts into all content areas.

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 324

Curriculum Development and Methods: Mathematics and Science

3 cr

Theories and strategies of the teaching of mathematics grounded in field experiences with emphasis on techniques for thematic teaching of integrated Math and Science. The course includes the diagnostic and corrective assessment and instruction process and error analysis. Field experience includes observation and teaching experience under the guidance of the master teacher and University supervisor with a focus on teaching practice in Mathematics and Science. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required).

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 325

Diagnosis and Correction: Mathematics

3 cr

Advanced strategies to support teaching to foster school age students’ mastery of mathematical concepts and skills through multiple representations of concepts, remediation to correct misconceptions or gaps in knowledge and error analysis. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 327

Curriculum Development and Methods: Music for Elementary Teachers

2 cr

Integrated, hands-on study of music and theory with parallels to the arts through a diverse selection of cultures designed to prepare the student to work in a multi-subject, K-6 classroom.

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 333C

Exceptionality and Diversity in the Classroom

3 cr

Overview of the characteristics and needs of exceptional and diverse learners. This course focuses on the curricular and instructional alternatives that address these needs. Emphasis will be on accommodations and modifications, data collection, assistive technology, and collaboration.

Co-requisites: In the event a teacher candidate is completing coursework leading toward a multi-categorical endorsement SPED 333C and SPED 333F are to be completed concurrently.     Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 333F

Exceptionality and Diversity in the Classroom Practicum

2 cr

Overview of the characteristics and needs of exceptional and diverse learners. This course focuses on the curricular and instructional alternatives that address these needs. Emphasis will be on accommodations and modifications, data collection, assistive technology, and collaboration. (20-40 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

Co-requisites: In the event a teacher candidate is completing coursework leading toward a multi-categorical endorsement SPED 333C and SPED 333F are to be completed concurrently.     Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.

EDUC 334

Reading in Content Areas

3 cr

Systematic introduction to current theory, research, and practice in the integration of literacy activities across content areas. Student work in cooperative groups to design, publish, and present a unit of study (or unit plan) using literacy strategies to address and assess content standards and objectives. The course involves simulated teaching discussion, position papers, reflective papers, and peer response. (30 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required).

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program

EDUC 341

Curriculum Development & Methods: Language Arts and Social Studies

3 cr

Study of Language Arts and Social Studies curriculum incorporating specific methods to prepare students to integrate Language Arts into K-6 content areas. Field experience includes observation and teaching experience under the guidance of the master teacher and University supervisor with a focus on teaching practice in Language Arts and Social Studies. (10 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required).

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 361

Overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders

3 cr

This course provides an overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders with an emphasis on instructional and behavioral strategies and practical theories for classroom management. An emphasis will be placed on current research. A field component provides experiential learning. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 375

Special Projects

Variable 1-3 cr

Development of a student-selected and instructor-approved project directly related to the teaching process, which may incorporate field and University activities. This may include a course with specific content in public school governance.

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 422

Special Education: Assessment & Methods – I

3 cr

Intensive study of assessment and instructional methods targeting behavior, reading, and spelling. Content will focus on these strategies that facilitate the use of the clinical teaching model with students with mild to moderate mental impairments, emotional and behavioral disorders, and specific learning disabilities. Field experience is in a special education classroom, focusing on the development, implementation, and monitoring of behavior interventions and reading and spelling strategies. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

Prerequisite: EDUC 320 and admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 423

Special Education: Assessment & Methods – II

3 cr

Continued study of assessment and instruction of students with mild to moderate mental impairments, emotional and behavioral disorders, and specific learning disabilities. Content will focus on written language, mathematics, social skills, functional behavior assessments, life skills, curriculum, and general content strategies. Field experience is in a special-education classroom, focusing on the development, implementation, and monitoring of strategies for increasing written language, mathematical, and social skills, as well as the evaluation of a variety of life-skills curricula. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

Prerequisite: EDUC 422 and admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 441

Diagnosis and Correction: Reading and Language Arts

2 cr

Lab-based extension of the assessment and instruction process through construction, administration, and interpretation of authentic reading and written language assessments; planning, teaching, and evaluating lessons that incorporate the instructional strategies acquired and practiced during class time. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

Prerequisite: EDUC 322 and admitted to Education Program.

EDUC 461

Curriculum Development and Methods for Special Education in the Classroom

3 cr

This course emphasizes specific instructional strategies, methods, curricula, and classroom management for teaching students with moderate mental impairments, emotional and behavioral disorders, specific learning disabilities, and autism spectrum disorder. Students will study procedures for specialization, modification and/or adaptation of materials and curriculum for these students, as well as learn how to develop and teach programs for individualized instruction. Knowledge of theory and practical experience will be applied through the required field component.

Prerequisites: EDUC 361 and admitted to Education Program. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

EDUC 473

WVTPA/Action Research

1 cr

Capstone activity in which students work with children in specific and assigned classes in a K-12 school in the licensure content and programmatic area(s), develop action research projects. They will prepare and present a summary of research-related activities and their results.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

EDUC 475

Student-Teaching Seminar

1 cr

Further development of knowledge and skills vital to successful teaching, examination of contemporary issues in education and development of a professional portfolio. This class is taken in conjunction with student teaching.

Corequisites: EDUC 475 and EDUC 481.     Prerequisite: Department approval.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.

EDUC 476

Evaluation

2 cr

Continuation of the development of the knowledge and skills needed to assess various aspects of teaching and achievement by all learners, the appropriate role of reflection and self-evaluation, the examination of research on assessment, and current reform movements. Also presented will be classroom, program, individual, formative, summative, traditional, and alternative assessment models.

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

EDUC 481

Student Teaching

Variable 3 [ACT] – 11 cr

A full semester (14 weeks) of teaching experience in specific and assigned classes in a K-12 school in the licensure content and programmatic area(s) under the direct supervision of a cooperating teacher selected by University faculty.

Prerequisite: Department approval.

ENGL 102

College Writing

3 cr

Review of basic writing skills, stressing the elements of clear and effective writing. By placement; does not satisfy core curriculum requirement.

Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 110

Process of Composition

3 cr

Elements of expository and persuasive essay writing; research techniques; revising prose for accuracy, precision and effective style. By placement. Core: EC.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENGL 115W

Explorations in Literature: Fiction, Poetry, and Drama

3 cr

This course will introduce students to various concepts and techniques of literary study using the genres of fiction, poetry and drama. Applying these fundamental tools of literary analysis, students will produce a variety of writing assignments. Core: EC.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENGL 150

Culture and Conflict in Literature

3 cr

Students will examine selected topics related to global perspectives within literary studies. Assigned literary texts must include a variety of perspectives of characters and authors from different ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Course topics will vary by section. Core: GP.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENGL 170

World Myth and Folktale

3 cr

Students will survey myths and/or folktales rooted in the oral tradition from a variety of world cultures representing broad regions in such places as Africa, the Americas, Asia, Australia, and Europe. The course will frame our contemporary understanding of world myth and folktale through an examination of literary works and/or films that have adapted earlier myth and folktale in order to appeal to a modern audience. Course topics will vary by section. Core: GP.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENGL 180W

Introduction to Creative Writing

3 cr

In this course, students receive an introduction to several forms of creative written expression through the study of outstanding examples of published craft and the drafting of original work. Creative media may include creative nonfiction, dramatic writing for the stage or the screen, fiction, and poetry. Core: EC.

Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 205W

Thematic Topics in Literature

3 cr

This writing-intensive core course will rotate every two years among several topics, such as "Literature of the Supernatural" (a historical and generic survey of literature that features supernatural elements), and "Literature and Nature" (literature that focuses upon human relationships to the natural world from the classical to contemporary eras). Core: EC.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110;     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

ENGL 206W

Thematic Topics in Literature

3 cr

This writing-intensive core course will rotate every two years among several topics, such as "Literature of the Supernatural" (a historical and generic survey of literature that features supernatural elements), and "Literature and Nature" (literature that focuses upon human relationships to the natural world from the classical to contemporary eras). Core: EC.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110;     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

ENGL 215

Children’s Literature

3 cr

This course will focus on the historical and cultural exploration of the concepts of the child and childhood in literature written both for and about children. Survey of dominant trends in British and American literature as reflected in the writings of the Romantic Period, the Victorian and Edwardian “Golden Age” of children’s literature, and the multiculturalism of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110.     Course Offered: Spring of every even year

ENGL 216

Young Adult Literature

3 cr

This course will focus on the development of the young adult literary genre in the twentieth century. Readings will include primarily prose works related to gender, race, and cultural diversity, as well as thematic topics involving various issues such as coming of age, technology, and dystopia. The course will also explore critical approaches to identifying reading material determined to be appropriate for secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110.     Course Offered: Spring of every even year

ENGL 270

Classical Myth

3 cr

Students will examine the nature and function of myth in the ancient Mediterranean world, focusing upon the narrative and symbolic structure of myths, the cultural contexts of myths and the influence of myth upon later literature. Texts will include Greek and Roman epic, Greek drama and myths as represented in ancient and modern art.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or permission of instructor.     Course Offered: Every Spring

ENGL 271

Norse Myth

3 cr

Students will examine the nature and function of myth in the medieval Northern European world, focusing upon the narrative and symbolic structure of myths, the cultural contexts of myths (particularly in terms of religious and philosophical belief), and the influence of myth upon later literature. Texts will include the Poetic and Prose Eddas, as well as later works that draw directly and indirectly from Norse myth, such as Wagner’s Ring Cycle, Beowulf, and Tolkien’s The Hobbit. Core: H

Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

ENGL 275W

Shakespeare

3 cr

This course will center on the life and works of Renaissance poet and playwright William Shakespeare. Students will study selected works—including sonnets, tragedies, comedies, and histories—with a particular focus on the dramatic, literary, historical, and cultural dimensions of Shakespeare’s art.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110.     Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 281W

Fiction Workshop

3 cr

Stephen King argues that to write well, one must first “read a lot.” This course and its requirements are divided roughly into two halves: reading exemplary works of fiction in order to learn the tools of the fiction writer’s craft and writing and revising original work in a workshop setting, where the work is discussed around a table with one’s peers. Core: EC.

Course Offered: Every Spring

ENGL 282W

Literary Nonfiction Workshop

3 cr

The first half of this course will be spent in studying exemplary works of creative nonfiction. In the second half of the course, emphasis will be placed on writing and revising original work in a workshop setting. Core: EC.

Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 283W

Poetry Workshop

3 cr

This course begins with an exploration of the various formal approaches the poet can take in creative composition. Students will be required to write in several different forms as a way of experimenting with the discipline of line and meter, ultimately compiling a small portfolio (3-5 poems) of revised, polished work. Core: EC.

Course Offered: Every Spring

ENGL 285W

Nature Writing Workshop

3 cr

This course focus on producing works of literary nonfiction and poetry that explore depictions of and ideas about the natural world. The emphasis of the course will be on writing and revising original work in a workshop setting. Core: EC.

Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 286W

Life and Times of Famous Authors: Research Methods I

3 cr

This writing-intensive core course will rotate every two years among several single-author studies, focusing upon a selection of works by a famous literary author. Students will study the author’s social, cultural, historical, and literary contexts while engaging in ethical research methods and implementing advanced writing skills. Core: EC.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110.     Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 287W

Life and Times of Famous Authors: Research Methods II

3 cr

This writing-intensive core course will rotate every two years among several single-author studies, focusing upon a selection of works by a famous literary author. Students will study the author’s social, cultural, historical, and literary contexts while engaging in ethical research methods and implementing advanced writing skills. Core: EC.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110.     Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 301

Topics in British Literature

3 cr

This course will examine the literary figures and movements from select periods within British literature, with a focus on the manner in which cultural, historical, and social elements influence the genres and themes within the literary period(s). It will rotate every two years between LIT 301 (Early British Literature) and LIT 302 (Later British Literature).

Prerequisite: ENGL 110

ENGL 302

Topics in British Literature

3 cr

This course will examine the literary figures and movements from select periods within British literature, with a focus on the manner in which cultural, historical, and social elements influence the genres and themes within the literary period(s). It will rotate every two years between LIT 301 (Early British Literature) and LIT 302 (Later British Literature).

Prerequisite: ENGL 110;

ENGL 303W

Topics in American Literature

3 cr

This course will examine the literary figures and movements from select periods within American literature, with a focus on the manner in which cultural, historical, and social elements influence the genres and themes within the literary period(s). It will rotate every two years between LIT 303 (Early American Literature) and LIT 304 (Later American Literature).

Prerequisite: ENGL 110;     Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 304W

Topics in American Literature

3 cr

This course will examine the literary figures and movements from select periods within American literature, with a focus on the manner in which cultural, historical, and social elements influence the genres and themes within the literary period(s). It will rotate every two years between LIT 303 (Early American Literature) and LIT 304 (Later American Literature).

Prerequisite: ENGL 110;     Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 305

World Literature

3 cr

Students will read significant works of world literature by a variety of writers that represent different geographical areas, authors, texts, contexts, and topics.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110.     Course Offered: Every Spring

ENGL 425

Introduction to Literary Theory

3 cr

This course will introduce students to various literary theories and to strategies for applying these theories to specific literary texts. Survey will range from early writings on literature by Plato and Aristotle to the proliferation of theory in the twentieth century, including psychoanalytic criticism, formalism, reader-response theory, deconstruction and new historicism.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110; ENGL 115W; or permission of instructor.     Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 474

Internship in English/Writing:

1, 2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship. Repeat up to 6 crs.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.

ENGL 484

Creative Writing Capstone Portfolio

3 cr

ENGL 486

Senior Literature Thesis I: Proposal and Research

1 cr

In this course, students will undertake the beginning stages of a major project requiring extended research and writing. This initial segment of the project requires a written proposal, an annotated bibliography, a progress report, and a rough draft. All phases will be supervised and evaluated by a faculty member in the literature program.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110; ENGL 115W; ENGL 286W or 287W; and senior standing.     Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 487

Senior Literature Thesis II: Revision and Presentation

2 cr

In this course, students will complete the major project they began in ENGL 487. This concluding segment of the project requires a second revised draft, a public presentation of the project’s results, and a final polished revision of the paper at the end of the semester. All phases will be supervised and evaluated by a faculty member in the literature program.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110; ENGL 115W; ENGL 286W or 287W; ENGL 486; and senior standing.     Course Offered: Every Spring

ENGL/W 473

Internship in English/Writing:

1, 2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship. Repeat up to 6 crs.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.

ENGR 110

Structured and Object-Oriented Programming

3 cr

Introduces algorithm and problem-solving methods. Emphasizes structured and especially object oriented programming concepts, I/O, control structures, functions and/or methods, data abstraction, data structures, and the study and use of an object technology high-level programming language.

ENGR 111

Engineering Orientation I

3 cr

The first course in a two-course sequence designed to orient students to the engineering profession. The first course covers ‘what is engineering?’ and the various engineering fields. Students use spreadsheets, word processors and presentation software as they learn to solve engineering problems, write technical reports, and prepare and give presentations. Students will practice ethical decision making while examining engineering issues and learn to work in teams.

Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGR 112

Engineering Orientation II

3 cr

The second course in a two-course sequence designed to orient students to the engineering profession. Solving engineering problems using computer software applications is emphasized. Students will further develop their problem solving and design skills by developing algorithms and converting them into MATLAB programs.

Course Offered: Every Spring

ENGR 243

Engineering Mechanics, Statics

3 cr

Statics of particles and rigid bodies, vector operations, equivalent systems, equilibrium, centroids and center of gravity, analysis of structures, shear and moment diagrams, bending stress and shear stress in structural members, loads, strain, friction and moments of inertia.

Prerequisite: MATH 191 and PHYS 151.     Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGR 244

Engineering Mechanics, Dynamics

3 cr

Kinematic and kinetic analysis of particles and rigid bodies, as well as an introduction to mechanical vibrations of simple systems. Topics include kinematics in 2- and 3-dimensions using Cartesian, path, and polar coordinates; kinetics using force-mass- acceleration, work-energy, and impulse-momentum methods; introduction to single degree of freedom vibration.

Prerequisite: ENGR 243.     Course Offered: Every Spring

ENGR 245

Strength of Materials with Lab

4 cr

Fundamental principles of mechanics of materials including: stress-strain curves, deformation, and failure of solid bodies under the action of forces, Mohr's circle, and mechanical properties of materials. Course will emphasize strength and elastic deflection of engineering materials due to loads applied axially, in torsion, in bending and in shear. Students will conduct basic experiments in strength of materials, including mechanical properties, stressstrain curves of materials and analyze beams under tension, compression and bending.

Prerequisite: ENGR 243.     Course Offered: Every Spring

ENGR 346

Thermodynamics

4 cr

An intermediate treatment of thermodynamics: Thermodynamic systems, work, heat, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, equations of state, entropy and exergy analysis of engineering systems.

Prerequisite: PHYS 251.     Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGR 347

Fluid Mechanics

4 cr

Description of fluid matter kinematics of fluid flow and similarity concepts. Derivation of the governing equations. Application to hydrostatics, boundary layers, separation, wakes and drag, pipe flow, compressible flow, and introduction to turbomachinery (with emphasis on pumps). Normal shocks and isentropic flow.

Prerequisite: ENGR 244.     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

ENGR 350

Electric Circuits with Lab

4 cr

An introduction to analog and digital electronics. Topics include basic circuit theory and the application of Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s Laws; time-domain and frequency domain responses for passive and active circuits; Boolean algebra and logic circuits; and analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters.

Prerequisite: PHYS 251.     Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGR 352

Mechatronics with Lab

4 cr

Synergistic integration of mechanical engineering with electronics and intelligent computer control in designing and manufacturing machines, products and processes; semiconductor electronics, analog signal processing, with op amps, digital circuits, Boolean algebra, logic network designs, Karnaugh map, flip-flops and applications, data acquisition, A/D and D/A, interfacing to personal computers, sensors and actuators, microcontroller programming and interfacing.

Prerequisite: PHYS 251.

ENGR 447

Project Management

3 cr

First course in the two-semester engineering capstone design sequence for Engineering Science majors. Presents methods essential to the design, planning, and execution of complex engineering projects. Includes instruction in contemporary project management methods and techniques, the organization of requirements and specifications, and the project manages role in project life cycle. The initiation and planning phases of a capstone engineering design project is completed in this course.

Prerequisite: senior standing.     Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGR 448

Materials Science

3 cr

Survey of engineering applications of non-ferrous and ferrous alloys, polymers, ceramics and composites. Basic crystallographic notation and molecular structure of common engineering materials. Principles of metallurgical thermodynamics and kinetics applied to phase transformations and strengthening mechanisms.

Prerequisite: ENGR 245.    Course Offered: Spring of every even year

ENGR 454

Systems Modeling and Control

4 cr

Introduction to control techniques. Dynamic analysis of linear feedback systems in the time and frequency domain, with emphasis on stability and steady-state accuracy. Includes modeling of electrical and mechanical systems; characterization of physical systems using linear, constant-coefficient differential equations and state-space models; Convolution using Laplace transform techniques; identification of system response using frequency response and Bode plots; specification of design criteria in the s-domain; and modification of system parameters to satisfy design requirements. MATLAB is used as simulation tools and as a computer interface for analysis and design.

ENGR 470

Advanced Economic Analysis

3 cr

Emphasizes the systematic evaluation of the costs and benefits associated with proposed technical projects. The student will be exposed to the concepts of the “time value of money” and the methods of discounted cash flow. Students are prepared to make decisions regarding money as capital within a technological or engineering environment. Topics include: analysis of engineering projects; interest rate factors, methods of evaluation, depreciation, replacement, breakeven analysis, after tax analysis, decision-making under certainty and risk.

Prerequisite: junior standing.    Course Offered: Spring of every even year

ENGR 473

Engineering Internship

1, 2, or 3 cr

Selection and direction of the internship will involve interaction with local communities or industries. Consent of the department required.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement. Repeat up to 6 crs.

ENGR 474

Engineering Internship

1, 2, or 3 cr

Selection and direction of the internship will involve interaction with local communities or industries. Consent of the department required.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement. Repeat up to 6 crs.

ENGR 475

Project Management

3 cr

Presents methods essential to successful execution of projects, from initiation, to planning, to execution, monitoring and controlling, and to closure. Topics include organizational structures, management functions, planning tools, scheduling techniques, pricing and estimating, cost control, trade-off analysis, and risk management. This course aligns with the Project Management Institute (PMI) standards for professional certification as a certified Project Management Professional (PMP).

Prerequisite: senior standing.    Course Offered: Every Fall

ENGR 476

Operations Management

3 cr

This course is an introduction to the field of operations management and focuses on how organizations transform inputs to products and services. Topics include: modeling and analysis of operations; supply chain analysis and planning; inventory control and warehouse management; logistics network design; and supply chain coordination.

Prerequisite: junior standing.     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

ENGR 484

Engineering Capstone Project

3 cr

Second course in the two-semester engineering capstone design sequence for Engineering Science majors. Continues study of the system software and hardware lifecycle. Emphasis is placed on system design, appropriate implementation in hardware and software, analysis, testing and evaluation, quality assurance, and documentation. The execution and closure phases of a capstone engineering design project is completed in this course.

Course Offered: Every Spring

ENVS 115

Environmental Conservation and Energy Sustainability

3 cr

An introduction to the study of energy for electrical power generation and transportation, including sustainable and non-sustainable energy sources. The social, economic and environmental impacts and effectiveness of these alternatives will be evaluated.

EXSC 120

Introduction to Exercise Science

2 cr

This is the gateway course for Exercise Science. This course covers the initial beginnings of modern day exercise science disciplines, professionalism, organizations related to the field, certifications, academic progression beyond the undergraduate degree, and opportunities existing upon graduation, and legal/liability issues. Some anatomy and physiology as it relates to exercise will also be addressed. This course is the pre-requisite course to all other EXSC classes.

EXSC 212

Motor Development

3 cr

This course is a view of the processes and mechanisms underlying the development of motor skills. Topics such as progressive motor patterns, cognitive, emotional, and physiological development, as well as fundamental motor development milestones in children will be discussed. In addition, this class also looks at motor activity across the lifespan inclusive of infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age.

Pre-req: EXSC 120

EXSC 222

Kinesiology

3 cr

Heavy emphasis on applied kinesiology pertaining to general musculoskeletal anatomy and joint dynamics related to degrees-of-freedom, planes of motion, arthrokinematics and osteo-kinematics will be addressed. The student will learn muscle origins, insertions, and nerve innervations of key muscles that promote movement as well as bony landmarks with regards to the skeletal system. The student will gain a very thorough foundation of the muscles responsible for human movement.

Pre-req: EXSC 120; EXSC 212

EXSC 231

Emergency Care and 1st Aid/CPR

2 cr

This course is designed to prepare the student to be able and capable in emergency situations, whether in an athletic environment or day-to-day life situations. Roles played by EMT’s / Paramedics / Athletic Trainers will be addressed as well as the legalities and potential liabilities that may exist when providing emergency care as a good Samaritan. The student will be required to certify in CPR/AED. First Aid certification will be recommended and encouraged.

Pre-req: BIOL 150/151, BIOL 152, EXSC 120

EXSC 312

Exercise Physiology I

3 cr

Exercise physiology is a foundational course in all matters of exercise science. An understanding of how the body is affected by acute increases in activity (i.e., physical labor, physical activity, exercise, etc.), as well as the chronic changes that occur with exercise and the factors that affect positive changes to those who consistently are physically active will be addressed. EXSC 313 EP Lab is to be taken in conjunction with this course as a Co-Requisite.

Prereqs: BIOL 150/151, BIOL 152, EXSC 120

EXSC 313

Exercise Physiology I Lab

1 cr

This lab corresponds with EXS 312 lecture and provides hands-on experience pertaining to the measurement of physiological variables during exercise. Assessment of health-related parameters including cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, body composition via both field and laboratory tests will occur. In addition, measurements in blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and other physiological variables will also be addressed. The initial preparation for a research project also begins with this course including the scientific process and IRB submission.

Co-Requisite: EXSC 312

EXSC 321

Principles of Strength and Conditioning

3 cr

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of strength and conditioning. Emphasis will be placed on the exercise sciences (including anatomy, exercise physiology, and biomechanics), nutrition, exercise safety and technique, needs analysis, program design, testing, and evaluation. NSCA certifications will be discussed and encouraged.

Pre-req: EXSC 312/313

EXSC 325

Sport Rehabilitation

2 cr

This course addresses the basics of musculo-skeletal rehabilitation of common injuries which could be sustained while participating in sports or recreational activities. Education in the process of inflammation, repair, and remodeling will occur as well as discussion of various protocols, progressions, and applications for injuries incurred which affect bone, nerve, ligament, tendon, muscle, and skin. A general knowledge will be gained by the student related to rehabilitation in a safe and conscientious manner. Roles played by ATC’s, PT’s, PTA’s, Coaches, and Strength & Conditioning Specialists will also be provided.

Pre-req: EXSC 312/313

EXSC 330

Nutrition in Sport and Exercise

3 cr

This course provides foundational principles in nutrition and caloric management. It focuses on what balance should be attained relating to carbohydrate, fat, and protein intake, caloric output and input, hydration, electrolyte management, body composition, and the unique needs of various athletes in various sports.

Pre-req: EXSC 312/313

EXSC 431

Cardiovascular Assessment and Cardiac Rehabilitation

3 cr

Heavy emphasis will be placed on the anatomy and physiology of cardio-pulmonary systems and peripheral circulation, hemo-dynamics, and regulation of circulatory performance. The cardiac cycle, heart sounds, and intrinsic electrical control of the heart are part of the academic challenge in this course. EKG interpretation, 12-lead placement, and various GXT protocols for those with cardiac and pulmonary compromises will be presented. In addition, the field of cardiac rehab as well as pulmonary rehab will be included.

Pre-req: EXSC 312/313

EXSC 441

Exercise Prescription for Special Populations

3 cr

This course provides an overview of the disease pathophysiology, the effects on the exercise response, exercise application, and exercise management in those suffering from chronic diseases and disabilities. Selected topics including cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, diabetes, obesity, frailty, pregnancy, muscular-skeletal disorders, and many other maladies will be presented.

Pre-req: EXSC 312/313

EXSC 451

Exercise Physiology II

3 cr

This course builds on the foundational exercise physiological concepts which were taught in Exercise Physiology I. EP II progresses to exercise training/adaptations, environmental influences on performance, optimizing performance in sport, gender considerations, and physical activity for health and fitness. The effect of CV disease, diabetes, and sedentary lifestyle will be reviewed and discussed.

Pre-req: EXSC 312/313; PSYC-115 strongly recommended

EXSC 452

Exercise Physiology II Lab

1 cr

This lab is intended to be taken in conjunction with EXSC 451 lecture. Various exercise testing protocols utilizing the treadmill, cycle ergometers, VO2/RER/RMR measurements, and further assessments in both health-related (cardio-vascular, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition) and skill-related parameters (agility, balance, coordination, power, speed, reaction time) are presented. The completion of the research project started in EXSC 313 lab should be completed in time for WJU’s Student Research Symposium.

Pre-req: EXSC 312/313; Co-req: EXSC 451

EXSC 453

Special Topics in Exercise Science

1 cr

The course will meet once a week and encompass many of the current exercise-related issues that affect our lives. A variety of areas where exercise is utilized, including rehab, sports, health, fitness, and function will be explored through current evidence-based research and articles. Critique and assessment of research articles will also be presented and required of the student.

Pre-req: EXSC 451

EXSC 483

Exercise Science Practicum

3 cr

The student will be required to participate in a practicum at a facility, or in a program, that is matched to their particular path (clinical, health & fitness, etc.). The student is responsible for securing a site at which to complete their practicum experience. Approval is required by the faculty advisor. A packet and guidelines will be issued to the student and the site for reference. The student will be evaluated by their on-site supervisor, as well as their faculty advisor. The practicum requires 135 contact hours over the course of the semester which is approximately 10 site contact hours per week. (Pre-req: at least EXSC-312/313) Please note: The student has the option of sitting for a quality certification in an exercise-related field in lieu of a practicum experience. Certifications in personal training, strength and conditioning, health and fitness are some examples. These are to be from well-known professional organizations such as the ACSM, NSCA, ASEP, NASM, ACE, etc. Approval from the ES Program Director is required. The student must pass the exam successfully and attain certification in order to receive a passing grade in this course. (Pre-req: at least EXSC 312/313)

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement

GEOG 101

Introduction to Geography

3 cr

This course considers how the key geographic concepts of place and space and t how these special physical characteristics have shaped human historical and present interactions, cultures, economics, and the environment in all world regions.

GEOG 121

World Geography

3 cr

A thematic survey aimed at understanding the contemporary world through an analysis of physical/environmental and cultural regions. Special attention is given to problems of social and technological change, political geographic disputes, and population growth.

GEOG/GIST 110

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

3 cr

Introduction to GIS is designed to provide the students with an understanding of the methods and theories of spatial analysis that will allow students to apply GIS knowledge and skills to everyday life and their chosen careers, to apply the course towards a certificate separately or as part of any major, and to prepare them for success in upper division courses in GIS.

GEOG/GIST 120

GIS Databases and Enterprise GIS

3 cr

This course is to designed to reinforce basic GIS fundamentals and to build skills in GIS data acquisition including finding, making, and importing spatial data and attributes and evaluating their quality, preprocessing GIS data to make them usable, and GIS data management in both local and enterprise spatial database systems using ArcGIS from ESRI.

GEOG/GIST 210

Cartography

3 cr

Cartography is a science of communicating spatial information with maps. The purpose of this course is to learn the concepts, principles, and techniques related to maps and map making. Students are expected to develop knowledge and expertise in map types, data selection, compilation, display, design, mapping tools & production techniques, and communication.

GEOG/GIST 220

Intermediate Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

3 cr

This course focuses on the study of spatial data structures and the display, manipulation, and analysis of geographic information. Students will study the technical aspects involved in spatial data handling, analysis and modeling. Instruction will include theories and procedures associated with the implementation and management of GIS projects.

GEOG/GIST 273

Internship in Geography/GIS

1, 2, or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement. Repeat up to 6 crs.

GEOG/GIST 274

Internship in Geography/GIS

1, 2, or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement. Repeat up to 6 crs.

GEOG/GIST 310

Advanced Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

3 cr

This course is a project-based exploration of advanced topics in GIS and geospatial technology, with a focus upon spatial modeling, advanced spatial analysis and geoprocessing, spatial data manipulation, and geo-computation.

GSCI 115

Integrated Sciences I

3 cr

An integrated science and math course for the non-science major. The course investigates science and the scientific method through selected topics in the traditional fields of biology, chemistry, physics, and earth and space science. Math topics are integrated as appropriate. A hands-on, student-centered approach is taken. Lab and lecture are integrated with the course meeting for 90 minutes three times per week.

Course Offered: Every Fall

GSCI 120

Integrated Sciences II

3 cr

An integrated science and math course for the non-science major. The course investigates science and the scientific method through selected topics in the traditional fields of biology, chemistry, physics, and earth and space science. Math topics are integrated as appropriate. Topics include sound and waves, electricity, astronomy, and geology. A hands-on, student-centered approach is taken. (Required for Elementary Education majors.)

Course Offered: Every Spring

HCMT 320

Management Techniques – Health Sciences

3 cr

An introduction to the principles, practices and problems of management encountered in the allied health professions.

HCMT 410

Management for Healthcare

3 cr

The course examines management concepts in healthcare with exposure to case management and applied practice.

HIS 351

Topics in The Western Tradition

3 cr

This course is a broad survey of Europe’s political, social, economic and cultural traditions with a stress on selected problems viewed from conflicting historical interpretations. Students will make use of both primary and secondary literature and make oral and written reports on the problems they have studied. (only offered every other year)

Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

HIS 352

Topics in The Western Tradition

3 cr

This course is a broad survey of European political, social, economic and cultural traditions and how those traditions have been spread throughout the world. Stress will be placed on selected problems viewed from conflicting historical interpretations. Students will use primary and secondary sources and make oral and written presentations on the problems they have studied. (only offered every other year)

Course Offered: Spring of every even year

HIST 115

The Twentieth Century

3 cr

This course begins with an examination of Europe’s position of political, economic and military dominance in the world in the decades before World War I. After a thorough treatment of the causes and effects of the Great War and the rise of Japan to great power status, our emphasis shifts to the international economic and political problems of the interwar era. We analyze the rise of authoritarian regimes of the right and left in Europe, the civil war in China and the imperialist powers’ weakening grip on their colonies in Africa and Asia. World War II and the Holocaust figure prominently in the second half of the course, as do the decolonization process, the Cold War between the U.S. and the Soviet Union and post-Cold War issues such as ethnic conflict and responses to globalization.

Course Offered: Every Fall

HIST 120W

Historical Methods

3 cr

The content of these courses (in terms of both geographic area and historical period) varies from instructor to instructor. All are designed to familiarize students with the methods and procedures used by historians in researching and writing about important historical trends and events. Course activities include using primary and secondary sources; developing a sense of interpretation grounded in creative, but responsible scholarship; improving writing skills in analytical, response and research papers; and giving oral presentations.

Course Offered: Every Spring

HIST 150

Studies in Art History

3 cr

This course will explore major works of world art and architecture both from a purely formal perspective as well as within the particular cultural contexts that produced them. Two broad periods of art history will be explored in alternating rotation: Classical Art and Archaeology through the Romanesque, and Western Art and Architecture from the Gothic through Modernism. Core: CC.

Prerequisites: None.    Course Offered: Every Spring

HIST 211

History of the American People I

3 cr

This course is an introduction to selected topics in American civilization from the colonial period to 1877. The objective of the course is to provide the student with a general but comprehensive understanding of American exploration, colonization, the Independence movement, the birth of American democracy, political party development, industrialization, reform movements, sectionalism, and reconstruction.

Course Offered: Fall of every even year

HIST 212

History of the American People II

3 cr

This course explores the social, cultural, political, intellectual, and economic development of the United States after the Civil War. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: Reconstruction, Industrialization, Immigration, the Labor Movement, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, Civil Rights, the Vietnam War era, and the Conservative Revival of the 1970s and 1980s.

Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

HIST 214

History of Appalachia

3 cr

An introduction to the history of the institutions and people of the Appalachian mountain region from the earliest years of exploration to the present.

Course Offered: Every Fall

MATH 101

Algebra Review

3 cr

A review of topics from elementary and intermediate algebra, including first order equations, exponents and radicals, polynomials, quadratic expressions, quadratic equations, rational expressions, linear and nonlinear systems of equations, inequalities and the binomial theorem. This course is preparatory and will not satisfy the University’s core curriculum requirement in mathematics.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

MATH 109

College Algebra and Problem Solving

3 cr

This course is designed to strengthen the student's pedagogy in mid-elementary, middle school, and practical mathematics. The course goal is to equip students to answer the question "how can I prepare myself and my students (and/or children) to be competent mathematics students?" Students will develop skills and gain the content knowledge necessary to be an effective, competent, and student-centered mathematics teacher.

Course Offered: Every Fall

MATH 115

Introduction to Statistics

3 cr

Descriptive statistics including measures of central tendency and variability, graphic representation, probability, the binomial, normal and T distributions, hypothesis testing and linear regression.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

MATH 151

Pre-Calculus

3 cr

A thorough preparation for calculus with analytic geometry, including conic sections, and the transcendental functions: logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

MATH 191

Calculus I

4 cr

A theoretical introduction to differential calculus including limits, continuity, the basic rules for derivatives and applications including optimization problems. A brief introduction to integration leading to the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus completes this course.

Prerequisite: MATH 151 or equivalent.    Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

MATH 192

Calculus II

4 cr

Transcendental functions, applications of integrals, volumes of revolution, surface areas; techniques of integration, including powers of trigonometric functions, integration by parts and by partial fractions, improper integrals, infinite series, Taylor’s expansion and indeterminate forms.

Prerequisite: MATH 191.    Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

MATH 193

Calculus III

4 cr

Vectors and vector valued functions, extrema of multivariate functions and the method of Lagrange multipliers, surfaces in three dimensions, line and surface integrals; multiple integration and Stokes’ Theorem.

Prerequisite: MATH 192.    Course Offered: Every Fall

MATH 212

Ordinary Differential Equations

4 cr

ODEs of first order: linear, homogeneous, separable and exact, with applications; orthogonal trajectories; those of second order: reducible to first order, general and particular solutions by the methods of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters and power series; and an introduction to numerical methods and Laplace Transforms.

Prerequisite: MATH 192.    Course Offered: Every Spring

MATH 215

Applied Probability and Statistics

3 cr

An introduction to probability: discrete and continuous random variables (binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, Poisson, normal, and exponential), sampling distributions, multivariate distributions and hypothesis testing. Covers the statistical analyses skills necessary to determine whether data is meaningful and how to predict, understand, and improve results.

Prerequisite: MATH 192.    Course Offered: Spring of every even year

MATH 235

Discrete Mathematics

3 cr

This course covers sequences, sets and relations, logic and truth tables, Boolean algebra, logic gates, combinatorics, probability, graph theory, algorithms, matrix algebra and determinants.

Prerequisites: MATH 191 or equivalent.    Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

MATH 250

Geometry

3 cr

Euclid’s Axioms, the parallel postulate, leading to non-Euclidean geometries, and an introduction to projective and affine geometries.

Course Offered: On Demand

MBA 500

Organizational Behavior and Leadership

3 cr

This course is concerned with the understanding, prediction and control of human behavior in an organizational setting. The primary emphasis is from a psychological perspective although concepts from other social sciences may be included.

Course Offered: Fall Session I

MBA 502

Marketing Management

3 cr

An analysis of marketing problems and concepts from a management viewpoint. The course stresses the relationships between overall corporate strategy and the marketing function. Topics include: market structure; distribution policies; pricing; sales management; product development; promotion and advertising; demand analysis and measurement; and consumer behavior. Managerial decision-making and the formulation of a formal marketing plan are the central focus of the course.

Course Offered: Spring Session II

MBA 503

The Ethical Environment of Business

3 cr

Philosophical study of the nature, types and criteria of human value with a study of ethical principles and major philosophies in the area. Special emphasis will be paid to the analysis of contemporary ethical problems in the world of work. Discusses the importance of management decisions in a business-centered society, such as the United States; the desire of businessmen to do what is right; the difficulties they sometimes encounter in acting ethically; and the complexity of their ethical dilemmas. Case studies will be extensively used.

Course Offered: Summer Session I

MBA 505

Quantitative Business Analysis

3 cr

A computer-aided introduction to the broad range of topics in the field of management science. Topics include: linear programming; model design; transportation model; inventory models; queuing theory; probability; decision analysis; sensitivity analysis; network analysis; computer simulation and project management.

Course Offered: Fall Session I

MBA 506

Managerial Economics

3 cr

A course dealing primarily with the application of economic concepts and analysis to managerial decision-making. Topics include: demand analysis and forecasting; price determination and marketing policy, production and output decisions; capital investment decisions; profitability and cost analysis. The computer will be employed to illustrate the application of quantitative and economic techniques to real business problems.

Prerequisite: MBA 496, 498.

MBA 508

Management of Financial Resources

3 cr

A study of the financial decision-making process within the business firm. Analyzes the problems, policies and functions involving financial management. Topics include capital market theory, cost of capital and capital budgeting decisions, capital structure and dividend policies and financial planning models.

Course Offered: Spring Session I

MBA 510

Accounting for Managers

cr

This course provides managers the ability to understand and apply accounting principles, determine information necessary for financial reporting, and examine the importance of ethical accounting standards and its impact on the accounting industry.

Elective     Course Offered: On Demand

 

MBA 512

Operations Management

3 cr

This course is designed to provide a background in production and operations in manufacturing and service organizations by teaching the student effective tools for decision-making. Specific topics covered include: manpower planning and control, inventory management, distribution systems, workflow scheduling and control, facilities planning and design, resource allocation, quality control systems, research and development, project planning and control, forecasting, network analysis and quality control. Prerequisite: MBA 505.  Elective D

Prerequisite: MBA 505.     Elective     Course Offered: On Demand

MBA 520

Managerial Policy and Strategy

3 cr

This capstone course is concerned with the development of approaches for defining, analyzing, and resolving complex strategic problems of profit and nonprofit organizations. Cases are used to place students directly into managerial roles with the responsibility of defining problems, developing solutions, and defining these solutions. At the option of the instructor, the course may involve the use of computer management simulation games.

Prerequisite: Completion of 75% of 500 level courses.     Course Offered: Spring Session I, Summer Session II

MBA 530

Management of Human Resources

cr

This course is concerned with the management and development of human resources. Considers topics such as the determination of personnel needs; selection of employees; the designing of effective personnel policies; compensation; health and safety; Equal Employment Opportunity Programs; and labor relations.   Elective D

Prerequisite: MBA 500.     Elective     Course Offered: On Demand

MBA 531

Effective Managerial Communications

3 cr

Successful communication is frequently a causal factor in organizational effectiveness. This case-oriented course examines the fragile nature of the communication process. Opportunities for students to learn and practice techniques for improving their communications skills are provided.

Prerequisite: MBA 500.     Course Offered: Fall Session II

MBA 539

Management of Information Systems

3 cr

This course provides the manager with a conceptual framework for using computer technology to meet strategic business goals. The latest information technology is discussed in the context of how if affects business operations and human resources. Primary focus is on the organizational and managerial aspects of information systems. Information systems development methods are evaluated. Other topics include internal controls, electronic data interchange, ethical issues and global information systems. Student performance is primarily based on case studies; projects and classroom involvements.

Prerequisites: MBA 500, MBA 512     Course Offered: Spring Session I, Summer Session II

MBA 547

Contemporary Economic Challenges

3 cr

MEL 500

Global Teaching and Learning

3 cr

Educators will understand how to re-align and modify their curricula to facilitate instruction that meets the needs of 21st century learners. Participants will refine and articulate their roles as educators and change agents in an era of reform. They will explore societal and economic factors driving educational change, identify critical learning and employability skills, and examine innovative instructional approaches that help teachers integrate 21st century context, content, assessment, and skills into mastery-based lesson plans.

MEL 510

Communication and Negotiation

3 cr

This course involves a study of verbal and nonverbal techniques that allow clear and direct communication. Students will understand the consequences of poor communication and ways to avoid it through open communication and correcting communication breakdowns. A study of active listening, tailoring your discussion to the audience, and body language will be examined in order to help educators learn to engage effectively with others. Participants will also understand how to set clear expectations and manage language and cultural barriers. The second half of the course deals with negotiation strategies. Participants will learn how to plan their negotiations and learn best practices to counter negative aspects of human interactions, as well as manage team negotiations and help get past impasses and deadlocks.

MEL 520

Education Law & Ethics

3 cr

MEL 525

Psychology of Student Engagement

3 cr

Participants will demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and application of theories and principles of psychology that enhance student engagement and, thus, student achievement. Areas of emphasis in this course will be human development, learning, memory, motivation, individual differences, instruction, classroom management, assessment, and evaluation.

MEL 530

Transformational Leadership

3 cr

MEL 535

Project-Based Learning

3 cr

Participants will be able to demonstrate an approach to learning in which problems serve as the stimulus for students to gain course concepts and content, as well as metacognitive skills. In this problem-based learning environment, students are charged with a project that involves confronting a problem before they receive all the information necessary to solve it. Students work in teams to define the nature of the problem, to identify what additional resources they need, and to find viable solutions. Faculty members act as facilitators by asking questions and monitoring group processes as students actively pursue viable solutions. Faculty members also guide students to resources. Students must generally re-apply the new knowledge to the original problem and communicate the results of their findings.

MEL 540

School Resource Management

3 cr

MEL 550

Field-Based Action Research

3 cr

This course introduces methods of qualitative inquiry and examines the principles of action research, a form of systematic study used to address challenging issues in the classroom, school, or district. Course topics include forms of qualitative inquiry, problem identification, selection of appropriate research methods, collecting and analyzing data, developing an interpretation, and reporting qualitative research. Students will read and evaluate qualitative studies in education, develop a basic fluency with qualitative research methods, and gain hands-on experience in applying such methods through class assignments and a mini-action-research project.

MEL 555

Meeting Unique Learning Needs

3 cr

Participants will be able to implement teaching strategies designed to create multiple paths that allow students of different abilities, interests, or learning needs experience equally appropriate ways to absorb, use, develop, and apply concepts as part of the daily learning process. Particular emphasis will be place on effective instructional strategies for students with special needs and limited English proficiency. Participants will be able to vary content, process, and process in unit and lesson plans. They will demonstrate proficiency in teaching the same curricula to all students, but individualizing the complexity of the content, learning activities and/or products in order for all students to be challenged and none are left unable to learn.

MEL 560

Data-Driven Decision Making

3 cr

Improving student learning and achievement can be accomplished most effectively through the use of data analysis to understand student learning needs and to make instructional decisions. Participants will gain knowledge and skill in using data to improve student learning. Educators will learn the importance of using data to plan appropriate instructional experiences and to identify and analyze the measures of data to understand student learning needs. Participants will develop the practice of gathering and analyzing data in a systematic and continuous manner.

MEL 565

Differentiating Instruction

3 cr

Participants will learn how to identify students’ readiness levels, interests, multiple intelligence profiles, and learning styles. They will design rich, tiered activities and assessments that allow students of all ability levels to learn the same essential concepts in different ways. Students will analyze examples of successful differentiated activities and differentiated instruction in classroom management. Core concepts addressed in this course are: understanding effective differentiation strategies and how to create environments that support the needs of all students in a diverse classroom.

MEL 570

Residency I

3 cr

During this course, students are placed in host K-12 schools for approximately 15 hours per week for a total of 200 hours per semester under aegis of an instructional coach who is considered to be a highly effective veteran educator. The student will gain an understanding of the authentic, day-to-day interactions in a real-world setting. Students will develop and evaluate their own professional skills through the opportunity to engage in a project-based learning situation. This experience will allow students to engage in the reflective practitioner process as a result of immersion in the field experience.

MEL 580

Residency II

3 cr

This is a continuation of Residency I. Students gain even more in-depth experience in a host school, as well as opportunities to practice and reflect on leadership theory as applied to authentic school-related experiences. The student will gain insight and construct meaning regarding the work of leadership in the school setting. Students are placed in host K-12 school systems for approximately 15 hours per week for a total of 200 hours per semester.

MEL 590

Professional Development Design

3 cr

In this course, students will research current trends in instructional design. They will work collaboratively in a problem-based learning exercise of producing and planning the delivery of a professional development program. The result will be a course portfolio containing workshop materials, instructional strategies research, needs assessment, application skill steps, motivational strategies, workshop proposal, workshop matrix, trainer’s manual, coaching worksheets, and training summary with evaluation. 

MEL 600

Systems Thinking for Education Leaders

3 cr

This course examines the interconnectedness among the elements that comprise the whole system to determine how a change in one area of the system may impact other areas of the system and how that influences the work to be done. Participants will navigate in an online environment, assess prior knowledge of systems thinking, review research and synthesize the commonalities among these works, examine individual systems, analyze and evaluate system components, understand the impact of change, and analyze issues through the lens of systems. They will apply knowledge to improve and solve problems at the school district or building level. 

MEL 620

Custom-Tailored, Constructivist Workshop

1-3 cr

Elective curricula designed to meet the specific needs of professionals, schools, and/or systems using best practices, constructivist theory, and information technology. This course involves the integration of research to practice.

MSA 509

Law for Accountants

3 cr

This course addresses the significant legal issues relevant to accounting and financial practices. This includes topics such as Sarbanes-Oxley, tax law and valuation practices. Teaching methods include class discussion, cases and examinations.

Prerequisite: Business Law.

MSA 534

Auditing and Professional Auditing Standards

3 cr

This course covers the history and development of auditing theory, practice, and professional standards and provides masters level students with discussions of the philosophical and practical aspects of major auditing topics. Various auditing topics are selected for discussion and for written research reports including: the theory of evidence; collection and analysis of evidence; materiality; internal control; ethics; the role of auditing in society; auditors’ responsibilities; planning and administration of an audit; reporting; use of statistical analysis; audits of EDP systems; the application of auditing standards; and new audit directions and perspectives.

Prerequisite: ACC 406 or its equivalent.

MSA 539

Advanced Information Systems

3 cr

This course provides the manager with a conceptual framework for using computer technology to meet strategic business goals. The latest information technology is discussed in the context of how if affects business operations and human resources. Primary focus is on the organizational and managerial aspects of information systems. Information systems development methods are evaluated. Other topics include internal controls, electronic data interchange, ethical issues and global information systems. Student performance is primarily based on case studies; projects and classroom involvements.

Prerequisites: MBA 510 or equivalent, MBA 512;     Core requisite: MBA 500.

MSA 541

Contemporary Accounting Theory

3 cr

This course is designed to systematize the theoretical foundations provided by all previous financial accounting courses. The aim of this course is to provide students with a general survey of financial accounting theory and policy. Students should emerge from this course with (1) increased knowledge about accounting research and the standards-setting process; (2) familiarity with various financial accounting paradigms; and (3) an in-depth understanding of the major problem areas in financial accounting. Topics include: various theories of income; alternative asset valuation bases; experimental applications in published financial statements; new developments in accounting theory; and current issues and problems in accounting.

MSA 543

Advanced Management Accounting

cr

An advanced study of cost concepts as they relate to the administrative process. Topics include: information and human behavior; management accounting concepts and conceptual frameworks; decision-making concepts; forecasting; extensions of cost-value-profit analysis; cost-benefit analysis of information; investigating of variances; allocation issues; social accounting and audits; strategic planning; advanced capital budgeting; performance evaluation; behavioral and quantitative aspects of transfer pricing; human resource accounting; ethics; etc.

Prerequisite: MBA 505 and MBA 510 or its equivalent

MSA 544

Investment Analysis and Management

cr

This course provides a background for judgment in the management of investments. Studies individual and institutional investment objectives and policies in relation to short- and long-term risks.

Prerequisite: MBA 508.

MSA 546

Cases in Managerial Finance

cr

Case studies dealing with operating problems in financial management; decision-making analysis of financial problems affecting both sources and expenditures of funds on either a long- or short-term basis.

Prerequisite: MBA 508.

MSA 553

Controllership

3 cr

This course studies the controller function within the contemporary organization. The controller is typically the chief accounting officer. The course studies the different functions for which the controller has traditionally been responsible as well as the changing role of the controller in the age of information technology.

Prerequisite: MBA 510 or ACC 311 or its equivalent.

MSA 554

Advanced Tax Accounting

3 cr

An examination of the federal tax treatment of corporations, partnerships, S corporations, fiduciaries, gifts, estates and trusts, and an introduction to social security taxes and tax research and methodology. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of income, deductions and credits; recognition and non-recognition of gains and losses from dispositions of property; the determination of entity and investor basis; distributions from, and liquidation of, the business entity; administrative provisions of the tax law; and tax planning.

Prerequisite: ACC 405 or its equivalent.

MSA 560

The Accounting Profession and Its Environment

3 cr

An integrative course which examines the ethical, legal, economic, social and political aspects of the accounting environment. Topics include: ethical dilemmas in accounting; the accounting standards-setting process; the structure of the accounting profession; professional conduct; the legal responsibilities and liabilities of professional accountants; user perceptions of professional accountants; and the impact of changing technologies and social institutions on accounting.

Prerequisite: MBA 534.

MSA 573

Internship

3 cr

The internship is a structured work practicum at an accounting firm or performing accounting functions at a for-profit or not-for-profit organization. A weekly journal and deliverable, either a project or paper are also required. The student’s current job is not eligible for internship credit.

MSN 500

Nursing Theories

3 cr

An examination of conceptual models and theories used to guide nursing education, practice, and research. The integration of grand and middle range theories. Scientific underpinnings from various disciplines are incorporated into discussing and critiquing theory. 

MSN 501

Nursing Research

3 cr

Exploration of both original research process and evidence-based practice is explored. The research process will include completion of a research proposal to resolve or explore practice issues. Ethical considerations of the research process are studied. Research is critiqued related to levels of evidence. Literature search skills are refined. Disseminating research results and use as a change agent is evaluated.

Prerequisite or co-requisite: MSN 500.

MSN 503

Health Care Policy and Politics

3 cr

The study of political, social, economic and ethical influences within the health care delivery system. Special attention is given to how change occurs and to how government (local, state, federal, global) regulations, stakeholders, consumerism, and court, agency and legislative actions impact on health care. Interprofessional collaboration is explored in achieving policy change. Incorporating research findings into policy change with the masters prepared nurse in a leadership role is explored.

MSN 514

Curriculum and Instruction

3 cr

This course applies theories and concepts from education, psychology and related fields to the development and analysis of curriculum materials, including classroom and clinical teaching methods. The concept of lifelong learning is explored.

MSN 515

Evaluation

3 cr

This course examines methods of measurement and various evaluation models and their application for analyzing student, health, and program outcomes. In depth examination of exam question development and test analysis is explored. Health literacy is incorporated into curriculum/teaching development.

MSN 516

Educational Technology

3 cr

This course applies the use of computer technology, audiovisual, multimedia and the Internet in curriculum design to improve patient and student education. Immersion into new technologies such as computer programs, communication, social media, and data management programs

MSN 520

Nursing Administration I

3 cr

The study of organizational theory, its applications and the basic principles of management, managerial technologies and managerial processes as they relate to administrative practice. Legal and ethical aspects of these issues are discussed.

MSN 521

Nursing Administration II

3 cr

Explores elements of patient care delivery systems such as continuous quality improvement, root cause analysis, failure mode analysis, risk management, standards of care and policy development. Quality initiatives are explored at a local, state, and national level. The financial effect of quality is included.

MSN 524

Financial Management

3 cr

Involves the study of health care budgets, productivity, staffing, variance analysis and patient acuity factors. Attention is given to the nurse manager’s budgeting and financial management responsibilities. Technology is incorporated into developing a budget. Business planning and marketing issues and strategies are also addressed.

MSN 525

Health Care Delivery Systems & Economics

3 cr

Explores the impact of managed care on the healthcare system. Emphasis is on understanding and implementing aspects of managed care and includes the financial, political, legal and ethical issues. Changes related to health care reform will be covered including: quality processes, health care reform, technology, and patient safety. The student will develop an understanding of how health care delivery systems are organized, financed, and changed.

MSN 527

Organizational Behavior

3 cr

This course prepares clinicians with skills in organizational behavior, clinical operations and system design, quality measurement and risk management, fiscal operations and systemic change and project management. It integrates individual behavior with organizational behavior. Specialized skills in organizational politics and policy development, implementation and impact analysis will be acquired. Working as an organizational leader, students are prepared for entry into mid-level clinical leadership and management positions.

MSN 528

Communication and Interpersonal Relations

3 cr

To promote successful communication for individuals, groups, and organizations. This case-oriented course examines the fragile nature of the communication process. Opportunities for students to learn and practice techniques for improving communication skills in a variety of health care situations are provided. 

** One-year RN experience required to take any clinical course

MSN 529

Advanced Comprehensive Assessment

cr

This course will review comprehensive assessment skills across the lifespan to equip nursing educators and administrators to improve the quality of patient care delivered. This course incorporates assessment skills, history and physical requirements, and documentation of these findings. Online simulation technology will be utilized. Students acquire the requisite advanced knowledge and skills within a case-based, problem focused learning framework that integrates theoretical, empirical, and experience-based practical knowledge.

MSN 530

Advanced Pathophysiology

3 cr

This course builds on knowledge of basic anatomy and physiology to examine alterations in cell and tissue mechanisms that cause disease and how these processes produce signs and symptoms that are recognized clinically. Students explore a variety of topics, such as immunity, inflammation, infection, and malignancy. They also examine a range of disease processes across the lifespan, using the body systems approach including hematologic, renal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular disorders.

MSN 531

Advanced Health Assessment

4 cr

This course focuses on providing students with advanced knowledge and skills in history taking and performing a physical assessment of individuals across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on the collection, interpretation, and synthesis of relevant historical, genetic, biological, cultural, psychosocial and physical data for the development of a comprehensive health assessment. Students critically analyze data to determine differential diagnoses and establish an accurate assessment of health status. Episodic, focused, and comprehensive assessments are the cornerstone of the course. Students are required to complete 56 clinical hours in a primary care setting obtaining patient histories and performing physical examinations across the lifespan with the guidance of a clinical preceptor. Emphasis is placed on history taking, physical examinations, including episodic, focused, and comprehensive assessments along with accurate documentation. Differential diagnosis is introduced.

MSN 532

Advanced Pharmacology

3 cr

The course provides the student with an understanding of pharmacological principles such as pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug metabolism, and dose-response relationships across the lifespan. Course content is geared towards providing the student with a solid foundation of the major pharmacological drug classes surrounding disease processes affecting the major organ systems, specifically therapeutic effects and adverse reactions, patient safety, and education.

MSN 533

Health Promotion

3 cr

Current research, theory, and practice trends of advanced nursing in health promotion, genomics, patient safety, and disease prevention across diverse populations will be examined. Population based health outcomes will be addressed across the continuum.

MSN 540

CAPSTONE

3 cr

Provides the students the opportunity to synthesize and apply acquired knowledge and skills to the analysis and prescription of alternative courses of action for the problems and policy issues encountered by nurse managers and educators.

MSN 541

PRACTICUM

3 cr

A clinical course (168 practicum hours) in which students are placed with preceptors in nursing or other administrative positions to apply concepts to actual practice.

MSN 565

Advanced Practice Nursing in the Primary Care of the Infant, Child, and Adolescent

6 cr

This course provides nurse practitioner students with the knowledge necessary for the practice of primary health care of children. Course content includes the principles of health promotion, disease prevention and assessment, diagnosis, and management of common primary health care problems in diverse pediatric populations. Using a family-centered and developmental perspective, related advanced pathophysiology, advanced pharmacology, psychosocial factors, and ethical considerations are explored. Students are required to complete 168 clinical hours in a pediatric primary care setting. With the guidance of a clinical preceptor students learn how to identify, diagnose, and manage common primary health care problems. They also gain confidence in clinical experience in a primary healthcare setting that provides opportunities to assess, diagnose, and manage acute and chronic illnesses commonly found in infants, children and adolescents.

Prerequisites: MSN 530, 532, 531C & D.

MSN 566

Advanced Practice Nursing in the Primary Care of Reproductive Health

6 cr

This course focuses on women and men from adolescence through maturity within the context of their sexual and reproductive development. The course provides the nurse practitioner student with the knowledge necessary to address the reproductive needs of patients in primary care. Content addresses pre- and post-natal care; health maintenance issues; common sexual and reproductive health problems; and sexuality and reproductive changes in men and women related to special health issues and aging. Related advanced pathophysiology, advanced pharmacology, psychosocial factors, and ethical considerations are explored. Students are required to complete 168 clinical hours in a primary care, urologic, obstetrical and gynecology practice setting. With the guidance of a clinical preceptor students learn how to identify, diagnose, and manage common primary health care problems associated with reproduction. They also gain confidence in clinical practice settings that serve women and men at different points in the sexual and reproductive continuum.

Prerequisites: MSN 530, 532, 531C & D.

MSN 567

Advanced Practice Nursing in the Primary Care of the Adult

6 cr

This course provides the nurse practitioner student with the knowledge necessary to provide comprehensive primary care to adults (18-65). Course content includes the principles of health promotion and disease prevention. Emphasis is on assessment, diagnosis, and management of common health problems, acute and stable chronic illnesses in the adult population. Related advanced pathophysiology, advanced pharmacology, psychosocial factors, and ethical considerations are explored. Students are required to complete 168 clinical hours in a primary care setting seeing adult patients. With the guidance of a clinical preceptor students learn how to identify, diagnose, and manage common problems seen in primary care and manage acute and stable chronic illnesses. They also gain confidence in clinical experience in a primary healthcare setting that provides opportunities to assess, diagnose, and mange acute and chronic illnesses commonly found in adults.

Prerequisites: MSN 530, 532, 531C & D.

MSN 568

Advanced Practice Nursing in the Primary Care of the Aging Adult

6 cr

This course provides the nurse practitioner student with the knowledge necessary for providing primary health care to the aging population (over 65). Course content includes the principles of health promotion, disease prevention and assessment, diagnosis, and management of common primary health care problems, and chronic illnesses in diverse elderly populations. Emphasis is placed on developmental needs and the pathophysiologic processes underlying common conditions. The impact of the family on the health of the elderly is explored. This course integrates the principles of health promotion, disease prevention, rehabilitation, and ethical decision making. Students are required to complete 168 clinical hours in primary care settings seeing aging population of patients. With the guidance of a clinical preceptor students learn how to identify, diagnose, and manage common problems seen in primary care and manage acute and stable chronic illnesses common in the elderly. They also gain confidence in clinical experience in primary healthcare settings that provide opportunities to assess, diagnose, and manage acute and chronic illnesses commonly found in the elderly.

Prerequisites: MSN 530, 532, 531C & D.

MSN 569

Role Seminar

2 cr

The focus of the course is on the role transition and issues unique to the specific role of the advanced practice nurse practitioner. Preparation for professional practice is emphasized and includes certification requirements, prescriptive authority, collaborative agreements, contract negotiation, continuing education, professional liability and ethical clinical practice. Students make professional presentations at a mandatory on-campus day on a variety of topics. In preparation for certification, a comprehensive exam is taken in this course. Must be taken concurrently with the last clinical course prior to graduation. 

NURS 201

Pathophysiology

2 cr

Pathophysiology will focus on the comprehension of the following body systems; endocrine, neurological, cardiac, respiratory, and renal as a foundation for nursing care. It requires correlations between normal and abnormal A & P as well as the processes resulting in the manifestations of disease. Prerequisites: none.

Course Offered: Every Spring, Summer

NURS 203

Health Assessment

2 cr

This course introduces the concepts and techniques of health and cultural assessment of individuals and families across the life span, for use with the nursing process. Emphasis is on history taking, inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation. Normal assessment findings, frequently, seen variations from normal, and cultural differences are discussed. The course introduces the concept of physical assessment across the lifespan.

Prerequisites: successful completion of NURS 227, PSYC 110, BIOL 150.    Course Offered: Every Spring, Summer

NURS 215

Concepts of Microbiology & Epidemiology

2 cr

The recognition of normal flora occurring on/within the human body, invasion processes, control mechanisms for the prevention of the spread of microorganisms and the effects of the infection by certain specific microbes will be covered. Principles of immunology are covered as well.

Course Offered: Every Spring

NURS 227

Clinical Nutrition

2 cr

A study of clinical nutrition as it relates to the nurses role in promoting health. Grade options: A-F. Prerequisites: none.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Summer

NURS 230C

Fundamentals of Nursing (Clinical)

2 cr

Fundamentals of nursing provides the student with all the nursing concepts and skills needed as a beginning nurse. It is a study and practice of basic patient care.

Prerequisites: successful completion of NURS 227, BIOL 150, PSYC 110.    Course Offered: Every Spring, Summer

NURS 230D

Fundamentals of Nursing

3 cr

Fundamentals of nursing provides the student with all the nursing concepts and skills needed as a beginning nurse. It is a study and practice of basic patient.

Prerequisites: successful completion of NURS 227, BIOL 150, PSYC 110.     Course Offered: Every Spring, Summer

NURS 309C

Intro into Nursing (Clinical)

3 cr

This course examines the fundamental principles of the delivery of care for the medical surgical population. Health care issues and diseases are explored and students are introduced to basic nursing concepts. This course also covers the study of public health and community nursing.

Prerequisite: successful completion of NURS 227, NURS 230, BIOL 150, BIOL 152, PSYC 212, GSCI 215.     Course Offered: Every Fall

NURS 309D

Intro into Nursing

3 cr

This course examines the fundamental principles of the delivery of care for the medical surgical population. Health care issues and diseases are explored and students are introduced to basic nursing concepts. This course also covers the study of public health and community nursing.

Prerequisites: successful completion of NURS 227, NURS 230, BIOL 150, BIOL 152, PSYC 212, GSCI 215.     Course Offered: Every Fall

NURS 319C (O)

Maternal Health (Clinical)

2 cr

This course focuses on the care of clients with acute health care needs with emphasis on the maternal and newborn client. Health care (normal and abnormal) aspects of each client population. Health care issues are explored. Grade Option: A-F.

Prerequisites: NURS 227, NURS 230, NURS 309, NURS 327, NURS 329.    Course Offered: Every Spring

NURS 319D (O)

Maternal Health

3 cr

This course focuses on the care of clients with acute health care needs with emphasis on the maternal and newborn client. Health care (normal and abnormal) aspects of each client population. Health care issues are explored. Grade Option: A-F.

Prerequisites: NURS 227, NURS 230, NURS 309, NURS 327, NURS 329.     Course Offered: Every Spring

NURS 320C

Medical/Surgical Nursing 1 (Clinical)

2 cr

This course examines the care of patients with multisystem needs throughout the lifespan with major emphasis on the adult client. Lifelong care and prevention of complications are emphasized. Grade Option: A-F.

Prerequisites: NURS 230, NURS 309, NURS 327, NURS 329.     Course Offered: Every Spring

NURS 320D

Medical/Surgical Nursing 1

3 cr

This course examines the care of patients with multisystem needs throughout the lifespan with major emphasis on the adult client. Lifelong care and prevention of complications are emphasized. Grade Option: A-F.

Prerequisites: NURS 230, NURS 309, NURS 327, NURS 329.     Course Offered: Every Spring

NURS 326C

Mental Health Nursing (Clinical)

2 cr

This course focuses on mental illness specifically diagnosis, etiology, and treatments. The study of mental health is essential in order to understand the rationale for medical and psychological therapies. The nurse, as the regulator of the clinical environment, needs an understanding of these in order to coordinate nursing care. Grade Option: A-F.

Prerequisites: NURS 329, NURS 309, NURS 327.     Course Offered: Every Spring

NURS 326D

Mental Health Nursing

3 cr

This course focuses on mental illness specifically diagnosis, etiology, and treatments. The study of mental health is essential in order to understand the rationale for medical and psychological therapies. The nurse, as the regulator of the clinical environment, needs an understanding of these in order to coordinate nursing care. Grade Option: A-F.

Prerequisites: NURS 329, NURS 309, NURS 327.     Course Offered: Every Spring

NURS 327

Elements of Nursing Research

3 cr

This course is designed to introduce students to the process of research. Principles, types, and methods of research will be examined as they apply to the principles of evidence based practice in the care of individual families, and communities. Peer-reviewed research will be retrieved, critically appraised, and synthesized with regards to design, level of evidence, rigor, dissemination/translation to practice, and conduct to protect the rights of research subjects.

Prerequisites: MATH 115-junior standing in the nursing department.     Course Offered: Every Fall

NURS 329

Pharmacology

3 cr

Assessing a patient’s response to drug therapy as an ongoing nursing responsibility. This course presents the principles of pharmacology as related to the nurses role in the assessment of the patient while promoting health.

Prerequisites: none-junior standing in the department of nursing.     Course Offered: Every Fall

NURS 405C

Medical/Surgical Nursing II (Clinical)

4 cr

This clinical experience includes interventions in acute crisis as well as monitoring and promoting health maintenance.

Prerequisites: NURS 309, NURS 320.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Summer

NURS 405D

Medical/Surgical Nursing II

3 cr

This course examines the care of patients with multisystem needs throughout the lifespan with major emphasis on the adult client. Lifelong care and prevention of complications are emphasized.

Prerequisites: NURS 309, NURS 320.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Summer

NURS 406C

Pediatrics/Genetics (Clinical)

2 cr

This course focuses on the care of the pediatric client and their family with acute healthcare needs who require adaption across the lifespan. This course focuses on the needs of the child as a unit where they play, live and go to school.

Prerequisites: NURS 309, NURS 320.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Summer

NURS 406D

Pediatrics/Genetics

2 cr

This course focuses on the care of the pediatric client and their family with acute healthcare needs who require adaption across the lifespan. This course focuses on the needs of the child as a unit where they play, live and go to school.

Prerequisites: NURS 309, NURS 320.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Summer

NURS 422C

Critical Care Nursing (Clinical)

2 cr

This course examines care of the client with complex needs. Emphasis is placed on setting priorities in acute crisis as well as long term health to prioritize and make decisions while delivering complex care in varied settings.

Prerequisites: NURS 320.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

NURS 422D

Critical Care Nursing

3 cr

This course examines care of the client with complex needs. Emphasis is placed on setting priorities in acute crisis as well as long term health to prioritize and make decisions while delivering complex care in varied settings.

Prerequisites: NURS 320.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

NURS 423C

Leadership and Role Development/Precepting (Clinical)

4 cr

This course is the clinical portion for senior year nursing students to complete their precepting before graduation.

Prerequisites: NURS 320, NURS 405.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.    Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

NURS 423D

Leadership and Role Development

2 cr

This course is designed as the didactic portion for senior year nursing students completing their precepting before graduation. The course is composed of case studies that are presented by the faculty and by the students to enable the students to combine knowledge from didactic learning with hands on nursing care.

Prerequisites: NURS 320, NURS 405.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

NURS 426

Nursing Trends and Issues

2 cr

This course focuses on analysis and discussion of current trends in nursing and the health care delivery system. Included is the consideration of the historical, social, political, economic, legal and ethical forces interacting with the issues in nursing.

Prerequisites: None.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

NURS 480

NCLEX Prep I

1 cr

The purpose of this course is to assist the senior level student in beginning to review nursing knowledge for the NCLEX-RN Exam. The course will help to develop skills in test taking strategies and review specific nursing content areas.

Prerequisites: None.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Summer

NURS 481

NCLEX Prep II

2 cr

The purpose of this course is to assist the senior level student in beginning to review nursing knowledge for the NCLEX-RN Exam. The course will help to develop skills in test taking strategies and review specific nursing content areas.

Prerequisites: NURS 480 NURS 405, C & D, NURS 406 C& D.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Summer

PHIL 115

Philosophy of the Human Person

3 cr

A philosophical study of the human person as a being who, while embodied in nature, is capable of rationally knowing, freely choosing, and creatively acting as a unique individual open to communion with others and with transcendent.

PHIL 305

Ethics

3 cr

How ought human beings live in society? A study of the nature, types and criteria of values, with an in-depth study of ethical principles and their applications to certain contemporary moral problems, e.g., abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, war and peace.

PHYS 107

Astronomy

3 cr

Introduction to and historical outline of astronomy and development of physical laws used to describe the solar system, space, stars, galaxies, the universe and some observational techniques.

PHYS 108

Geology

3 cr

Introduction to physical geology, internal structures of the earth, dynamical features, plate tectonics, crust and lithosphere production, balance and movement, oceans, seashore, continents, inland water and ice sheets.

PHYS 141

Physics I

3 cr

To be taken concurrently with PHYS 142. An algebra-based introduction to the concepts and methods of physics: I; Kinematics and Newtonian Mechanics in 1 -d, Work and Energy, Gases, Fluids, Thermodynamics, Modern Physics: II; Newtonian Mechanics in 2-d, Electricity and Magnetism, Waves, Sound and Optics. Students need to have good algebra skills and basic Trigonometry.

Course Offered: Every Fall

PHYS 142

Physics Lab I

1 cr

To be taken concurrently with PHYS 141. Experiments designed to supplement the lecture course and to provide proficiency in the methods of measurements, the analysis and presentation of data and the interpretation of results.

Course Offered: Every Fall

PHYS 241

Physics II

3 cr

To be taken concurrently with PHYS 242. An algebra-based introduction to the concepts and methods of physics: I; Kinematics and Newtonian Mechanics in 1-d, Work and Energy, Gases, Fluids, Thermodynamics, Modern Physics, II; Newtonian Mechanics in 2-d, Electricity and Magnetism, Waves, Sound and Optics. Students need to have good algebra skills and basic Trigonometry.

Course Offered: Every Spring

PHYS 242

Physics Lab II

1 cr

To be taken concurrently with PHYS 241. Experiments designed to supplement the lecture course and to provide proficiency in the methods of measurements, the analysis and presentation of data and the interpretation of results.

Course Offered: Every Spring

POSC 120

American Political Process

3 cr

Operations of the American government and their consequences for the population. Policies on management of the economy, defense and foreign policy, poverty, race relations. Roles of the Presidency, bureaucracy, Congress, courts. Nature of elite and mass political ideas and opinions.

PSYC 110

General Psychology

3 cr

A survey of contemporary psychology, including the topics of conditioning and learning, sensation and perception, psychophysiology, motivation and emotion, memory and cognition, development, social behavior, psychological testing, personality, psychopathology and psychotherapy. Participation in research projects or an alternative exercise is required.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

PSYC 115

Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

3 cr

Students will learn to analyze and interpret data using descriptive and inferential statistics. Measures of central tendency, variability and hypothesis testing using parametric and non-parametric tests will be discussed. Correlation, ttests, regression, z-scores, chi square and analysis of variance will be presented. The course will make significant use of the SPSS computer analysis program.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110 with grade of C+ or better.     Course Offered: Every Spring

PSYC 130

States of Consciousness

3 cr

A seminar examining theoretical and empirical bases of human consciousness, noting physiological correlates. Topics include sleep, dreaming, hypnosis, meditation, biofeedback, sensory deprivation, drug-induced states and death, as well as the cultural shaping of ordinary consciousness.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110.     Course Offered: Spring of every even year

PSYC 211

Experimental Psychology

4 cr

An introduction to the principles and methods of experimental psychology, with laboratory investigation.

Prerequisite: PSYC 115 with a grade of C or better.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.     Course Offered: Fall of every odd year

PSYC 212

Developmental Psychology

3 cr

An analysis of development throughout the life-span, with a special emphasis on various theoretical approaches to development. Designed for non-psychology majors. Students taking this course should not take PSYC 214, 216, or Prerequisite: PSYC 110.

Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

PSYC 214

Child Psychology

3 cr

A study of the physiological, intellectual, social and emotional factors in child development. The course will emphasize contextual factors that influence child development outcomes. Students taking this course should not take PSYC 212.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110.     Course Offered: Every Fall

PSYC 216

Adolescent Psychology

3 cr

A study of basic research and theories concerning development in the adolescent years.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110. Required for 5-12 content specialization licensure.     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

PSYC 220

Educational Psychology

3 cr

A study of the cognitive and affective dimensions of student behavior with an emphasis on the theoretical conceptions of learning which underlie education methods. Professional Education students should register for the section designated for them.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110.     Course Offered: Every Fall

PSYC 221

Applied Behavior Analysis

3 cr

This course is about the ways in which environmental contingencies modify behavior in individuals. The conceptual framework, broadly called "applied behavior analysis" (ABA), is a set of principles for describing and testing environment/behavior relationships using single-subject research methods.

Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

PSYC 235

Intimate Human Relations

3 cr

A data based study of biological, religious/historical, cultural and individual determinants of intimate human behavior.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110.     Course Offered: Every Spring

PSYC 238

Psychopharmacology

3 cr

Examination of how drugs affect our behaviors, thoughts and emotions. The course will address the impact of psychopharmacological use and abuse in society, how drugs can alter neuronal information processing, pharmacodynamics, analysis of pharmacological agents with particular attention given to the psychological effects of these drugs and the applicability of pharmacological agents to the treatment of psychopathologies.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110.     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

PSYC 240

Foundations of Social Work

3 cr

Foundations of Social Work is a seminar and experiential-learning course designed to explore an overview of the Social Work field. The primary goal is for students to understand what social work entails and how it is implemented by professionals. The course explores the theoretical, ethical, economic, political, cultural, and justice forces that impact the field on a macro level. With that foundation, students work through the stages of the helping profession: engagement, assessment, intervention, and termination at a micro level. This course delves into the marginalized and vulnerable populations of our society to prepare students to be empathetic, knowledgeable professionals.

Course Offered: Fall of every even year

PSYC 250

Sport Psychology

3 cr

An examination of sports from an empirical point of view with emphasis on behavioral/learning principles as they apply to the influence of sports on athletes and spectators.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110.     Course Offered: Every Spring

PSYC 262

Psychology in Film

3 cr

The course will take a problem-based pedagogical approach. Each week students will be shown a film, and specific questions will be presented for them to address in a written commentary. To do this effectively, the student will need to reflect upon and apply psychological theories, hunt down additional information concerning each film, competently analyze a variety of film character/writer/director aspects (behaviors, motivations, social influences, etc.) and provide personal beliefs and interpretations.

Course Offered: Fall of every even year

PSYC 300

Directed Research

1, 2, or 3 cr

Under the direction of a faculty member, students design and carry out empirical research in psychology.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211 with grade of C or higher and permission of the instructor.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.    Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

PSYC 311

Physiological Psychology

4 cr

A study of the physiological correlates of human behavior, especially the relationship between brain and behavior; Research Elective.

Prerequisites: BIOL 115 or BIOL 120, PSYC 211.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.     Course Offered: On Demand

PSYC 313

Motivation and Emotion

4 cr

A study of motivational and emotional processes from physiological, individual and social standpoints; data based theories of motivation and emotion evaluated. Research Elective.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211 with grade of C or higher.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.    Course Offered: Fall of every even year

PSYC 314

Social Psychology

4 cr

A study of the effects of the group on individual behavior, including the topics of aggression, persuasion, attitudes, compliance, obedience, attraction, and person perception. Research elective.

Prerequisite: PSYC211 with grade of C or higher.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.    Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

PSYC 315

Tests and Measurements

4 cr

An analysis of psychological tests and measurements, including tests of intellectual level, specific aptitude and personality; test construction, reliability, validity, norming procedures and ethical issues emphasized. Research elective.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211 with grade of C or higher.     Course Offered: Fall of every even year

PSYC 317

Cognitive Psychology

4 cr

An introduction to the higher mental processes from an experimental point of view, including the topics of memory and attention, thinking, creativity, language behavior and cognitive development. Research Elective.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211 with grade of C or higher.     Course Offered: On Demand

PSYC 319

Sensation and Perception

4 cr

A study of the reception and interpretation of sensory information, including study of how sensory receptors function and factors which affect perceptual organization; Research Elective.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211 with grade of C or higher.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement.    Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

PSYC 320

Learning

4 cr

An introduction to the basic theoretical, experimental and applied concepts in learning, with particular emphasis on operant and classical conditioning. Research Elective.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211 with grade of C or higher.     Course Offered: Spring of every even year

PSYC 330

Personality

3 cr

A survey of the various theories of personality, including psychoanalytic, behavioral, phenomenological and dispositional, and the study of various methods for assessing personality.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110.     Course Offered: On Demand

PSYC 335

Psychotherapy

3 cr

A discussion of assessment techniques, empirically-based treatments, strategies for prevention of mental illness and ethical issues in therapy.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110. (Offered every four years).     Course Offered: Spring of every even year

PSYC 340

Abnormal Psychology

3 cr

A study of the major predisposing and precipitating factors in the development of abnormal behavior, with emphasis on the biological, social and cultural factors involved.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110.     Course Offered: On Demand

PSYC 350

Health Psychology

3 cr

An investigation of factors that promote health, as well as those contributing to illness and behaviors related to illness. Research methods of gathering data within this developing field are stressed.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110.     Course Offered: Every Fall

PSYC 381

Junior Seminar

1 cr

This course will provide students with an opportunity to assess their educational progress to date and to make plans for future study and career endeavors. Please note that we will assess not only academic preparation, but also students’ interests, emotional development, and life goals. Successful completion of the course should enable students to move easily into their senior year with confidence and clear goals.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110 and junior standing.     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

PSYC 410

Advanced Statistics and Data Management

1 cr

Seminar course designed to introduce the student to advanced statistical analysis and data management techniques, which will be further emphasized in a graduate-level setting. The course begins with a brief review of basic statistics and SPSS computing procedures. Topics then include non-parametric statistical procedures, qualitative data analysis, partial correlation, analysis of covariance, multivariate analysis of variance, multivariate analysis of covariance, multiple linear regression, factor analysis, discriminate analysis, cluster analysis, path analysis, logit modeling and trend analysis. Data management issues concern determining the appropriate statistical analysis to use for a given data set, interpretation and evaluation of published research and discussion of issues related to missing, outlying and improperly coded data.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211 with grade of C or higher and permission of instructor.     Course Offered: Spring of every odd year

PSYC 420

History and Systems of Psychology

4 cr

An overview of the roots of scientific psychology in philosophy and experimental physiology, and a detailed examination of the systems of structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, humanism, Gestalt psychology and psychoanalysis.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110, junior level status.     Course Offered: Every Spring

PSYC 481

Senior Seminar

1 cr

This course will provide students with a capstone for the Psychology major. Successful completion of the course should enable students to move easily into graduate school or employment settings.

Course Offered: Every Fall

PSYCH 473

Internship in Psychology

1, 2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement. Repeat up to 6 crs

PSYCH 474

Internship in Psychology

1, 2 or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement. Repeat up to 6 crs

SOCI 121

World Community

3 cr

An introduction to the global environment. Topics include world geography, comparative cultures, international conflict and economic interdependence.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

SPAN 101

Introduction to Spanish I

3 cr

This is the first in a series of introductory level Spanish language classes. The focus will be on the development of listening, speaking, reading, writing and culture. It is intended primarily for students who have not studied the language or have had only one year of foreign language instruction.

SPAN 102

Introduction to Spanish II

3 cr

This is the second in a series of introductory level Spanish language classes. The focus will be on the development of listening, speaking, reading, writing and culture. It is intended primarily for students who have completed or tested out of SPAN 101 Introduction to Spanish I.

SPED 320

The Special Education Process

3 cr

Study of the history of special education incorporating significant legislation, litigation, and trends. Important practices, including the referral process, functional behavior assessments, transition plans, 504 plans, IEPs, and the continuum of classroom services.

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.

SPED 333C

Exceptionality and Diversity in the Classroom

3 cr

Overview of the characteristics and needs of exceptional and diverse learners. This course focuses on the curricular and instructional alternatives that address these needs. Emphasis will be on accommodations and modifications, data collection, assistive technology, and collaboration.

Co-requisites: In the event a teacher candidate is completing coursework leading toward a multi-categorical endorsement SPED 333C and SPED 333F are to be completed concurrently. (10 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required).    Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement

SPED 333F

Exceptionality and Diversity in the Classroom Practicum

2 cr

Overview of the characteristics and needs of exceptional and diverse learners. This course focuses on the curricular and instructional alternatives that address these needs. Emphasis will be on accommodations and modifications, data collection, assistive technology, and collaboration.

Co-requisites: In the event a teacher candidate is completing coursework leading toward a multi-categorical endorsement SPED 333C and SPED 333F are to be completed concurrently. (20-40 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required).    Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement

SPED 361

Overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders

3 cr

This course provides an overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders with an emphasis on instructional and behavioral strategies and practical theories for classroom management. An emphasis will be placed on current research. A field component provides experiential learning.

Prerequisite: Admitted to Education Program. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

SPED 422

Special Education: Assessment & Methods – I

3 cr

Intensive study of assessment and instructional methods targeting behavior, reading, and spelling. Content will focus on these strategies that facilitate the use of the clinical teaching model with students with mild to moderate mental impairments, emotional and behavioral disorders, and specific learning disabilities. Field experience is in a special education classroom, focusing on the development, implementation, and monitoring of behavior interventions and reading and spelling strategies.

Prerequisite: EDUC 320 and admitted to Education Program. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

SPED 423

Special Education: Assessment & Methods – II

3 cr

Continued study of assessment and instruction of students with mild to moderate mental impairments, emotional and behavioral disorders, and specific learning disabilities. Content will focus on written language, mathematics, social skills, functional behavior assessments, life skills, curriculum, and general content strategies. Field experience is in a special-education classroom, focusing on the development, implementation, and monitoring of strategies for increasing written language, mathematical, and social skills, as well as the evaluation of a variety of life-skills curricula.

Prerequisite: EDUC 422 and admitted to Education Program. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

SPED 461

Curriculum Development and Methods for Special Education in the Classroom

3 cr

This course emphasizes specific instructional strategies, methods, curricula, and classroom management for teaching students with moderate mental impairments, emotional and behavioral disorders, specific learning disabilities, and autism spectrum disorder. Students will study procedures for specialization, modification and/or adaptation of materials and curriculum for these students, as well as learn how to develop and teach programs for individualized instruction. Knowledge of theory and practical experience will be applied through the required field component.

Prerequisites: EDUC 361 and admitted to Education Program. (20 Hours Field Placement in Schools Required)

THEO 115

The Religious Quest

3 cr

An introduction to how people address such “religious” issues as faith, doubt, deity, good, evil, community, salvation and worship. Particular attention is given to ways of interpreting the Bible, and how this sacred literature addresses the lives of its many readers.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

THEO 117

Catholicism

3 cr

An introduction to foundational questions regarding the meaning and practice of Catholicism.

Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

THEO 236

The Church

3 cr

A presentation of the Church’s understanding of itself, its membership, ministry and mission to the world.

THEO 241

Catholic Social Thought

3 cr

An introduction to basic principles of Catholic Social Thought (e.g., the sacredness of human life, the common good, preferential option for the poor, subsidiarity) with a particular focus on the economic, social, political, and ecological issues raised by globalization in the early twenty-first century.

THEO 252

World Religions

3 cr

A study of the origins, history and beliefs of the major Western and Eastern religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam, with an emphasis on interreligious understanding.

THEO 305

Theological Ethics

3 cr

A study of the foundations of moral theology, including methodological and anthropological questions as well as attention to decision-making in the context of specific social and political issues that students are likely to encounter in the contemporary world. A writing-intensive capstone course introducing foundations of theological ethics as well as attention to virtue and decision-making in the context of contemporary personal, social, and political issues.

Prerequisites: sophomore standing.     Course Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

THEO 483

Pastoral Practicum

3 cr

This practicum is designed for persons planning a career in professions that “minister” to the public, e.g., theology majors, social science majors, health professions. In their practicum, students put learned theory to practical application by doing weekly “pastoral” work in places such as parishes, Catholic Social Services, neighborhood centers, campus ministry, and other religious laity work environments. Practicum learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member. Students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours per week at their practicum site and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

*Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement. Repeat up to 6 crs

THMT 125

Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality Management

3 cr

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of management related to the tourism and hospitality industry. Topics include financial management and accounting, human resource issues, hotel and resort management, food and beverage management, and event management.

THMT 225

Tourism and Hospitality Marketing

3 cr

This course is about the successful marketing principles employed in the tourism and hospitality industry. Demand variables, distribution channels, communications, promotions, research, packaging, collateral materials, pricing strategies, the marketing plan, and enhancing internal sales may be covered.

Cross-listed BUSN 225

THMT 265

Strategic and Risk Management in the Tourism and Hospitality Industry

3 cr

This course examines risk management concepts and strategies within tourism and hospitality industry. Risk management helps employees to identify, analyze, assess, and hopefully, avoid or mitigate risks coming from a variety of sources, such as financial upset, legal ramifications, accidents, natural disasters, data or cyber security breaches, and many more.

Cross-listed BUSN 265

THMT 403

Legal and Ethical Issues in the Tourism and Hospitality Industry

3 cr

This course is an introduction to the legal and ethical principles that affect the hospitality and tourism industry. Students will review theory and application of general and contract law as they relate to business, employee, and public management regulations. Students will also learn the legal and ethical issues as they relate specifically to the travel and tourism industry.

Crosslisted BUSN 403

THMT 471

Internship in Tourism and Hospitality Management

1, 2, or 3 cr

This internship offers the opportunity to put learned theory to practical application in a supervised work environment. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours and complete a portfolio culminating the internship.

Crosslisted BUSN 471.     *Satisfies EXSL Core Requirement. Repeat up to 6 crs.

WFYS 101

First Year Experience, Service, Reflection Seminar I

3 cr

This seminar is designed to assist the student with the transition to a university living and learning environment, providing opportunities and direction on how to develop an education for life, leadership, and service with and among others.

Course Offered: Every Fall